CLOSE X
RSS Feed LinkedIn Instagram Twitter Facebook
Search:
FMG Law Blog Line

Posts Tagged ‘appellate court’

YMCA Owes No Duty To Provide Or Use AEDs When Renting Field To Private Soccer Club

Posted on: October 17th, 2018

By: Carlos Martinez-Garcia

California’s Fourth District Court of Appeal recently affirmed the trial Court’s order granting summary judgment in favor of the YMCA, disposing of a wrongful death lawsuit involving a patron who died of a heart attack on their property. The appellate court agreed YMCA had no statutory or common law duty to provide or utilize AED devices to an adult experiencing cardiac arrest, when that adult is a permissive user of the facility whose independent soccer club rented an outdoor portion of YMCA’s soccer field.

Decedent Mr. Adeal Jabo was a member of a private soccer league (“The League”) which rented the YMCA’s enclosed soccer field independent of the YMCA’s memberships. The YMCA had defibrillator AEDs on its premises and regularly took AEDs to YMCA-led sport events, however, it did not bring AEDs to the League games since the games were independent of the YMCA. Mr. Jabo experienced cardiac arrest after a League game, later dying from the attack. Mr. Jabo’s on site medical care was limited to CPR despite AED devices available at the front desk of the YMCA.

The presence and use of AEDs at facilities are governed by CA Health & Safety Code section 104113 and Civil Code sections 1797.196 and 171421. “Health Studios” are required to acquire, maintain and train personnel on the use of AEDs.

Although the Appellate Court held the YMCA was a “health studio” towards its members, in this case it was renting a field to a nonmember League that did not choose to accept YMCA’s membership or regulatory practices. The Court narrowly construed the statutory language that imposes duties on Health Studios to its members. Consequently, the YMCA did not bring itself within the statutory definitions and duties applicable to “health studios” that are required to supply AEDs to ensure the safety of its members.

Next, the Court looked at Civil Code 104113, which outlines duties related to AEDs, and also grants immunities for not only the use of AEDs, but also their nonuse. The Court held that as a matter of law, Civil Codes 1797.196 and 171421 did not impose a duty on the YMCA’s employee to apply and activate an AED given the ‘nonuse’ portion of the statute, even though the YMCA had an AED on site to promote the safety of its members and other patrons on site.

Lastly, the Appellate Court determined that the YMCA had no common law duty to supply and implement an AED, because it did not take any action to increase risk of injuries to the Soccer League members, and the YMCA merely rented a portion of its property for the League’s independent use. Imposing a common law duty on the YMCA would improperly broaden the Legislative’s intent.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Carlos Martinez-Garcia at [email protected].

California Appellate Court Concludes That Employer Lawfully Rounded Employee Time Up and Down

Posted on: July 12th, 2018

By: Laura Flynn

The Second District of the California Court of Appeal has ruled that calculating payroll by automatically rounding workers’ hours either up or down to the nearest quarter-hour is legal as long as it does not result in workers being systematically underpaid over time. In a published opinion, the three-judge panel found the payroll system implemented by a Southern California hospital system was neutral both on its face and in the way it was applied.

Under the employer’s payroll system, an hourly worker who clocked in between 6:53 and 7:07, was paid as if they clocked in at 7:00.  Meal breaks that lasted between 23 and 37 minutes were rounded to 30 minutes.  The legality of the calculation method was challenged by two former employees who alleged they weren’t paid properly or given adequate meal breaks or rest periods.  The primary allegation was that the rounding system did not comply with the California Labor Code because it did not use employees’ exact clock-in and clock-out times.

A statistical expert analyzed the time records for all of the hospital employees over a four-year period.  Although some employees lost work time, the remainder either gained time or broke even. Overall, the calculation method resulted in the employer over compensating employees.  The Appellate Court held a rounding system is valid if it “average[s] out sufficiently,” rejecting claims that minor discrepancies in an individual employee’s wage calculations establish that the employee is entitled to assert a claim for underpayment.

The Court relied on Section 785.48 of title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations which allows employers to round work time as long as it doesn’t result in workers being underpaid over statistically significant periods of time. California’s Division of Labor Standards Enforcement has adopted the federal regulation as part of its enforcement standards.  The Court’s opinion confirms Section 785.48 and the policies underlying it “apply equally to the employee-protective policies embodied in California labor law.”

AHMC Healthcare, Inc. v. Superior Court, filed 6/25/18, Los Angeles Superior Court Case No. B285655.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Laura Flynn at [email protected].