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Posts Tagged ‘FMLA’

Georgia Employers Must Become Familiar With State’s New Paid Leave Law

Posted on: July 9th, 2018

By: Will Collins

Across the country, there are an increasing number of state laws requiring that employers provide paid sick leave, including paid leave for the care of a family member. For instance, under the Georgia Family Care Act, which went into effect in July of 2017, employees who work at least 30 hours per week and receive a paid sick leave benefit may use up to five (5) days per calendar of that paid leave to care for “immediate family members.”  This includes the employee’s child, spouse, grandchild, grandparent, parent, or “any other dependents as shown on the employee’s most recent tax return.”

To be clear, the Act, which applies to the State of Georgia and all of its political subdivisions and instrumentalities as well as all employers with twenty-five (25) or more employees, does not create an obligation to provide sick leave, but instead requires covered employers that elect to provide paid sick leave to allow their employees to use a portion of that leave to care for immediate family members.

Georgia is just one of several states, including New York, expanding paid family leave obligations. While Georgia stopped short of mandating paid sick leave, eleven (11) other states have laws addressing paid leave policies. As a result, employers must be mindful of state law requirements as well as unpaid leave obligations under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

If you have questions about your leave policy or leave obligations, please contact one of the attorneys in our National Labor and Employment Practice Group to help you navigate the state and federal regulations and answer questions as they arise.

To FMLA or not FMLA, that is the question…

Posted on: November 10th, 2017

By: Christopher M. Curci

FMLA and ADA leave questions are some of the most frequent that we receive from our clients.  Deciding whether an employee’s absence should be designated as FMLA leave, or granted as a reasonable accommodation under the ADA, is a legal land mine.

Fortunately, at least one federal judge in Pennsylvania recognizes the employer’s dilemma.  In Bertig v. Julia Ribaudo Healthcare Group, LLC, the employee suffered from bladder cancer and asthma, which are disabilities under the law.  She requested and was granted one month of FMLA leave in May of 2012.  She returned to work in June of 2012 as planned.

Beginning in April of 2013 and continuing through April of 2014, the employee called out sick thirteen times for various reasons, such as foot pain and a sore throat. She was terminated for violating the company’s attendance policy.  The employee filed suit alleging that she informed management that her absences were related to her disabilities, therefore her absences should have been designated as FMLA leave.  She also brought a claim for failure to accommodate her disabilities under the ADA.

The Court ruled in favor of the employer. The employee admitted during her deposition that ten of her thirteen absences were unrelated to her disabilities.  Because her absences were not disability-related, her termination did not violate the FMLA or ADA.  But, the most important takeaway in this case is the Court’s implication that the employer was not obligated to make further inquiry as to whether those absences were related to the employee’s disability before it made the decision to terminate her employment.  That burden fell on the employee given the totality of facts here.

While this decision is very fact specific, it is nonetheless a win for employers who struggle with FMLA/ADA leave requests. Just because an employee took FMLA leave in the past for a disability does not necessarily mean that the employer has a burden to inquire whether subsequent absences are related to that disability – especially when the absences occurred ten months later and the employee gives non-disability related reasons for the absences.

All employers should have written FMLA and ADA policies advising employees of their FMLA and ADA rights, and should document reasons for employee absences. Christopher M. Curci represents employers in litigation and advises his clients on all aspects of employment law.  If you need help with this or any other employment issues, he can be reached at [email protected].

Third Circuit Reminds Employers To Draft Compromise Agreements Carefully

Posted on: October 6th, 2017

By: Mark C. Stephenson

On August 12, 2104, Craig Zuber suffered a work-related injury, and then filed a workers’ compensation claim and took medical leave. He returned to work on August 14 and requested a further week of medical leave on August 17, 2014, which was granted. Zuber returned to work on August 26. On September 10, department chain Boscov’s fired Zuber. Six months later, on April 8, 2015 Zuber signed a Compromise and Release Agreement before the PA Department of Labor and Industry Workers’ Compensation office. In response, Zuber sued under the FMLA and Pennsylvania common law, which the federal district court dismissed based on the agreement’s express terms.

Boscov’s countered by contending that Zuber’s suit was barred as the result of the compromise reached in the state administrative proceeding. The agreement stated that “Employer and Employee intend for the [Agreement] to be a full and final resolution of all aspects of the … alleged work injury claim and its sequela whether known or unknown at this time.” The agreement further stated that “Employee is forever relinquishing any and all rights to seek any and all past, present and/or future benefits in connection with the alleged work injury,” and required the Employee to acknowledge that if the agreement were to be approved by a workers’ compensation judge, his claim would be closed forever and that his appellate rights waived.

Looking to solely to contract law, the Third Circuit rejected Boscov’s expansive reading of the agreement’s waiver provision as well beyond the contemplation of the parties in reaching their compromise of claims. Boscov’s argued that the term “sequela,” commonly understood as a medical term referencing the aftermath of sickness or injury, encompassed any and all rights that Zuber may have had to maintain a legal claim against the Employer arising from his work injury, no matter how distantly. The Third Circuit found support in its narrow reading of the agreement in the document’s structure, which was expressly stated to address Zuber’s work-related injuries only, and a common sense reading of the workers compensation case release and its limited purpose.

The decision serves as a useful cautionary warning to employers to be clear when stating what rights employees waive when compromising their claims. Here, post hoc, Boscov’s tried and failed to recast a limited agreement into a global resolution of claims between the parties. The Third Circuit makes clear that it will not allow employers to beat a narrow shield secured in settling a lesser claim into a broad sword to defeat an employee’s ensuing claims that are well outside the intended scope of the parties’ compromise.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Mark C. Stephenson at [email protected].

 

Extended Medical Leave Held Not Reasonable Accommodation Under ADA

Posted on: October 2nd, 2017

By: Amy C. Bender

Accommodations for disabled workers, and particularly requests for medical leave, continue to present challenges for employers. Who is considered disabled? Do I have to provide employees additional time off work after FMLA, other statutory leave entitlements, and PTO have been exhausted? If so, how much leave do I need to provide? How will I cover the employees’ duties during the absence? If I give additional time off to one employee, will I have to do it for everyone? The questions seem endless.

Fortunately for employers, a recent federal court decision has held that a multi-month medical leave of absence is not a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The court reasoned that the ADA is not a medical leave statute, but rather is intended to prohibit discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities and to require reasonable adjustments to jobs to enable those employees to perform their essential job functions. By contrast, an extended medical leave does not help a disabled worker perform the job, but rather excuses the inability to work, and thus is not a “reasonable” accommodation. The court noted that a short-term leave of a couple days or even a couple weeks may be a reasonable accommodation, depending on the circumstances. There is no bright line between “short-term” and “long-term” leave, and of course, the facts of each situation will vary. However, the case signals good news for employers by placing some limitation on the ever-increasing accommodation obligation. The decision may be read here.

FMG’s Labor and Employment Law team can assist your organization in responding to accommodation requests, defending ADA claims for failure to provide an accommodation, and implementing effective discrimination and accommodation policies and strategy.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Amy C. Bender at [email protected].

Employers Should Start Using New FMLA Certification Forms

Posted on: June 24th, 2015

By: David Cole

The U.S. Department of Labor recently issued updated health care provider certification forms for employers to provide employees who request leave pursuant to the Family and Medical Leave Act.  The new forms include the following:

 

 

 

  • Certification of Health Care Provider for Employee’s Serious Health Condition;
  • Certification of Health Care Provider for Family Member’s Serious Health Condition;
  • Notice of Eligibility and Rights & Responsibilities;
  • Designation Notice:
  • Certification of Qualifying Exigency for Military Family Leave;
  • Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of Current Servicemember – for Military Family Leave; and
  • Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of a Veteran for Military Caregiver Leave.

The most notable update to the forms are references to the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (“GINA”), a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against an applicant or employee because of his genetic information.  This reference, found in the form’s opening instructions, warns health care providers not to provide information about “genetic tests, as defined in 29 C.F.R. §1635.3(f), genetic services, as defined in 29 C.F.R. §1635.3(e), or the manifestation of disease or disorder in the employee’s family members, 29 C.F.R. §1635.3(b).”  Essentially acting as a safe harbor, this instruction protects employers from a GINA violation if they inadvertently receive genetic information from a health care provider in response to a lawful request for information under the FMLA.  The DOL also revised the certification forms to instruct employers that “genetic information” received in response to the certification must be kept confidential, in accordance with GINA’s requirements.

Employers should begin using these forms immediately.  They are valid through May 2018, and can be downloaded here from the DOL’s webpage.