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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

If You Don’t Have Anything Nice To Say….You Probably Shouldn’t Post It!

Posted on: August 22nd, 2018

By: Shaun DaughertySamantha Skolnick

Mothers all over the world have admonished their children: “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.”  It may lose something when translated into some obscure dialects, but the sentiment was still there.  Now that we live in the age of technology, it appears that the old saying could use a facelift.  “If you don’t have anything nice to say, you should not type it anywhere on the internet.”  That is especially true if you are criticizing doctors and hospitals.

A wave of litigation has been emerging involving doctors and hospitals, but in these instances, they are not the targets, they are the plaintiffs.  Doctors and hospitals are starting to sue their patients for negative reviews on social media. The most recent example earned itself an article in USA Today where retired Colonel David Antoon had to pay $100 to settle felony charges for emailing his surgeon articles that the doctor found threatening as well as posting a list on Yelp of the surgeries the urologist had scheduled for the same time as his own.  Antoon alleged that his surgery left him incontinent and impotent and he had tried to appeal to the court of public opinion.

In other news, a Cleveland physician sued a former patient for defamation after the negative internet reviews of her doctor reached the level of deliberately false and defamatory statements. The case may be headed to trial in August. Close by, a Michigan hospital sued three relatives for Facebook posts and picketing which amounted to defamation, tortious interference and invasion of privacy. The family claimed that the hospital had mistreated their deceased grandmother.

We live in a country that ensures freedom of speech, and that right is exercised more than ever with the advent of social media and an ever-growing audience of participants.  However, there can be consequences if the speech is inaccurate or defamatory in nature.  While some attorneys, like Steve Hyman, cite the law in stating that “[t]ruth is an absolute defense. If you do that and don’t make a broader conclusion that they’re running a scam factory then you can write a truthful review that ‘I had a bad time with this doctor.’”  Other commentators, like Evan Mascagni from the Public Participation Project, tout avoiding broad generalizations, “If you’re going to make a factual assertion, be able to back that up and prove that fact.” That is defense against defamation claims 101.

The world of non-confrontational criticism on social medial makes it easy and tempting to post an emotionally fueled rant.  But beware!  You want to avoid a situation like that of Michelle Levine who has spent nearly $20,000 defending herself against a suit filed by her Gynecologist over defamation, libel, and emotional distress. The 24-hour rule is still a viable alternative to hitting “send” or “post.”  Type it out, let it sit and ruminate for a bit, and then decided if you are going to post the negative comments for the world to see.  Some opinions are worth sharing, or you may decide…. don’t say anything at all.

If you have any questions or would like more information please contact Shaun Daugherty at [email protected] or Samantha Skolnick at [email protected].

Smart Cities Face Hacking Threat

Posted on: August 15th, 2018

By: Ze’eva Kushner

As you sit in traffic, frustrated and wondering why the city or municipality cannot do something to ease congestion, know that a city’s use of internet-connected technology to make your commute better may also invite hackers to wreak havoc on your city.

Traffic is just one of many problems that “smart cities” use internet-connected technology to address.  A smart city can set up an array of sensors and integrate their data to monitor things like air quality, water levels, radiation, and the electrical grid.  That data then can be used to automatically inform fundamental services like traffic and street lights and emergency alerts.

Smart city technology provides many benefits to city management, including connectivity and ease of management.  However, these very same features make the technology an attractive target for hackers.  In a recently released white paper, IBM revealed 17 vulnerabilities in smart city systems around the world.  Some of these risks were as simple as failing to change default passwords that could be guessed easily, bugs that could allow an attacker to inject malicious software commands, and others that would allow an attacker to sidestep authentication checks.  Additionally, use of the open internet rather than an internal city network to connect sensors or relay data to the cloud presents an opportunity for hackers.

Atlanta is an example of a smart city that is attempting to improve its efficiency by employing smart city technology, with its focus being mobility, public safety, environment, city operations efficiency, and public and business engagement.  Atlanta knows all too well how crippling a hack can be, as it suffered from the ransomware attack in the Spring that kept residents from services such as paying their water bills or traffic tickets online.  The hacking threat to smart cities is real and significant.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Ze’eva Kushner at [email protected].

Head In the Cloud – United States Supreme Court Takes On Application of Domestic Warrant To Information Stored Internationally

Posted on: March 9th, 2018

By: Glenn M. Kenna

The Supreme Court is set to decide a vital question this term – Can the government use a warrant served in the United States to obtain emails stored abroad?  The United States Government says it can, Microsoft disagrees.  The Case is United States v. Microsoft Corporation, in which the Supreme Court heard oral argument on February 27, 2018.

To understand the nature of the conflict a little back story is necessary.  Congress passed a law in 1986, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA).  Part of title II of the ECPA, 18 USC § 2703, allows law enforcement agencies to issue warrants, so called Section 2703 Warrants, to discover electronic communications stored in an “electronic communications system.”  In other words, the government can serve a warrant on an email service provider, such as Microsoft, and obtain emails stored on Microsoft’s servers.

In the Microsoft case, the Government did exactly that.  It served a warrant on Microsoft in Redmond Washington to discover electronically stored communications in connection with an ongoing investigation into a crime allegedly committed in the United States.  The issue at the heart of the dispute is that the warrant sought the contents of communications stored on servers in Ireland.  In response to the warrant, Microsoft turned over domestically stored information (in this case certain metadata about the emails) but refused to turn over the contents of the communications stored abroad.  A legal battle between the Government and Microsoft has ensued, ultimately leading to the Supreme Court granting cert.

In the ongoing dispute between Microsoft and the Government, Microsoft contends that the Government’s attempt to enforce the warrant is an extraterritorial act, i.e. and attempt by the Government to enforce Untied States Law abroad.  It further asserts that complying with the warrant could run afoul of the law in the country where the information is stored.  The United States’ position is that, should the ECPA not apply to information stored abroad, every service provider would simply move their servers out of the United States – taking the communications beyond the reach of US law enforcement agencies.  Moreover, it reasons, Microsoft can access the information domestically regardless of where the information is stored, which the government contends does not require the application of the ECPA abroad.

The ECPA pre-dates the internet.  Email as we know it today did not exist in 1986.  The drafters of the ECPA could not have imagined a world where people stored their entire lives on remote servers, or a world where those servers could be located anywhere across the globe.  Those are issues with which courts continue to struggle, including the Supreme Court in this case.

It remains to be seen how the Court will rule in the Microsoft case, or if Congress will act to modernize the ECPA before the Court’s decision (indeed, a bipartisan group of senators has introduced the CLOUD act to address the issues raised in the Microsoft case.)  What is clear, however, is that Microsoft represents just one small part of an ongoing clash between law and technology.  While not at issue directly in the Microsoft case, the dispute also raises the question, what right do we have in the privacy of our electronic worlds?

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Glenn Kenna at [email protected].

UPS Orders Tesla Electric Big Rigs – One Step Closer to Driverless Semis

Posted on: December 22nd, 2017

By: Wayne S. Melnick

Last month, Tesla Motors announced that it was taking its electronic vehicle technology one step further with the unveiling of the Electric Semi Truck .  If the numbers are to be believed, the Tesla Semi not only achieves 0-60 in five seconds (unloaded) by also reduces the cost of shipping from $1.51/mile to $1.26/mile.

Earlier this week, United Parcel Service announced it was going all-in on the Tesla Semi ordering 125 of the new units.   At an estimated cost between $150,000-$200,000/unit, that order could be worth as much as $25M.  (Yes, 25 Million Dollars).  If you’ve been following this story, this is not the end of the line, but rather, just the beginning. With that big an investment, it is clear that UPS and Tesla have their eyes on the future.  Electronic Trucks are just the first steps towards what is expected to the ultimate goal: Driverless Semis.

We will continue to keep watch of developments of this technology.  Needless to say, the idea of Driverless Semis raises all sorts of legal and insurance questions.  As such, it is important to stay on top of developments and FMG will continue to keep you informed as they occur.

If you have any questions or would like further information, please contact Wayne Melnick at [email protected].

GPS Tracking Devices – The Answer to Stopping High-Speed Pursuits?

Posted on: November 1st, 2017

By: Sun Choy

In the era of drones and artificial intelligence, it was only a matter of time before technology caught up to stopping high-speed pursuits. In a suburb of metropolitan Atlanta, a police department successfully deployed a GPS tracking device to terminate a pursuit and later arrest the fleeing suspect based on the information transmitted by the device. At a cost of $5,000 a piece, it may be cost prohibitive for many agencies. Even if available, many pursuits may still require immediate termination by PIT maneuver (Pursuit Intervention Technique) or spike strips to stop the danger posed by the fleeing suspect. While it remains to be seen how effective the GPS tracking device will be long term, it is encouraging to see technology used to mitigate the inherent dangers associated with high-speed pursuits.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Sun Choy at [email protected].