CLOSE X
RSS Feed LinkedIn Instagram Twitter Facebook
Search:
FMG Law Blog Line

Georgia Supreme Court Finds Fault with the Court of Appeals’ Decision Requiring a Full Retrial on Apportionment

Posted on: June 9th, 2017

By: Robyn Flegal

In July of 2007, Joshua Martin suffered a brutal gang attack outside of Six Flags Over Georgia and was left with severe brain damage. On June 5, 2017, the Supreme Court of Georgia granted certiorari to decide the following two questions: “(1) whether Six Flags could properly be held liable for the injuries inflicted in this attack; and (2) assuming liability was proper, whether the trial court’s apportionment error does indeed require a full retrial.” The Supreme Court reinstated a $35 million verdict for Mr. Martin, holding that the jury was authorized to find Six Flags liable for the breach of its duty to exercise ordinary care in keeping its premises safe for invitees. The Court then remanded the case to the trial court for a determination as to apportionment of fault.

The jury had apportioned fault between the parties by assigning 92% of the $35 million verdict against Six Flags, and 2% against four of Martin’s attackers. Six flags argued that the jury should be entitled to apportion damages among not only named defendants, but also among individuals who were alleged to have been involved in Martin’s attack. Georgia law provides that, when assessing percentages of fault, the trier of fact shall consider the fault of all persons or entities who contributed to the alleged injury or damages, regardless of whether the person or entity was, or could have been, named as a party to the suit. OCGA § 51-12-33.

The Georgia Supreme Court acknowledged that two of Mr. Martin’s assailants should be added to the verdict form, and decided that apportionment could be decided without a full retrial. “[A]s a general matter, where correction of an apportionment error involves only the identification of tortfeasors and assessment of relative shares of fault among them, there is no sound reason to disturb the jury’s findings on liability or its calculation of damages sustained by the plaintiff.” The Court did, however, concede that a retrial on apportionment might require the presentation of much or all of the same evidence as was presented when determining liability.

To be sure that fault is properly apportioned, Georgia attorneys must include on the jury verdict form all individuals, including the plaintiff, who contributed to the injury or damages.¹

For more information contact Robyn Flegal at [email protected].


¹ While this particular case was not a life sciences case, these principles also apply to drug and medical device trials in Georgia.

 

Comments are closed.