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Serving That Whiskey Might Be Risky – Liability Of Social Hosts In DUI Accidents

Posted on: February 15th, 2019

By: Stacey Bavafa

Under California Civil Code Section 1714, social hosts and other third parties may be held to be partially liable in the event of a drunk driving accident depending on the circumstances that led up to the accident. Under Sec. 1714, everyone is responsible for the result of his or her willful acts, but also for injuries sustained by another by a want of ordinary care or skill in the management of his or her property or person.

California courts have held that the furnishing of alcoholic beverages is not the proximate cause of injuries resulting from intoxication, but rather that the consumption of alcoholic beverages is the proximate cause of injuries inflicted upon another by an intoxicated person. Vesley v. Sager (1971) 6 Cal.3d 153; Bernhard v. Harrah’s Club (1976) 16 Cal.3d 313; and Coulter v. Superior Court (1978) 21 Cal.3d 144.

Therefore, social hosts who provide alcoholic beverages to a person may not be held legally accountable for damages suffered by the intoxicated person, or for damages the intoxicated person inflicts on another person resulting from the consumption of alcoholic beverages. In other words, if John Doe had 5 glasses of whiskey at a bar and ends up swerving in and out of his lane due to his inebriated state, and hits another vehicle causing injury to a third person, the bar who provided John Doe the 5 glasses of whiskey will not be required to pay for damages sustained by the third party.

There are however, two exceptions to the rule outlined above:

If an adult, including a parent or guardian, who knowingly serves alcoholic beverages at his or her residence to a person whom he or she knows, or should have known, to be under 21 years of age, the adult may be held liable for actions the minor takes as a result of the consumption of alcohol.

Further, if a business sells alcohol to an obviously intoxicated minor, in such that a reasonable person would be able to tell the minor was intoxicated, the business may face liability for harm arising out of the minor’s actions.

In the case of the underaged drinker, both the underaged drinker and the person who was harmed by the actions of the underaged drinker can file a civil claim against the social host or business to obtain recovery of his or her medical bills, property damage, pain and suffering, loss of income, and legal fees.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Stacey Bavafa at (213) 615-7026 or [email protected].

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