CLOSE X
RSS Feed LinkedIn Instagram Twitter Facebook
Search:
FMG Law Blog Line

Employers Beware – Social Security No-Match Letters are Making a Comeback

Posted on: December 26th, 2018

By: Layli Eskandari Deal

Like a bad penny, the Social Security no-match letters will once again turn up and wreak havoc on employers. It is anticipated that employers will once again start receiving these no-match letters, officially called the “Employer Correction Request Notice,” in the Spring of 2019. The SSA will start notifying employers if the W-2 (Wage and Tax Statements) information contains a social security number and a name that do not match.

These no-match letters have been around for a while, but SSA has not issued them consistently. The idea behind these letters is to notify employers when there is a mismatch between the name and the social security number provided and the SSA records. This can happen for a variety of reasons such as simple human error in imputing the information (such as misspelled name or transposed numbers). Of course, this can also result from an employee providing a false social security number or using another individual’s social security number.

On its face, it seems logical that the SSA would want to correct any mismatched information in an individual’s account. However, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has indicated that there is a duty by the employer to investigate the reasons for the discrepancy. ICE has warned that these letters, if uninvestigated, can lead to a finding of “constructive knowledge” of unauthorized employment during an audit.

Unfortunately, employers are stuck in the middle. SSA states that the no-match letters are not addressing unlawful employment but, on the other hand, ICE is indicating that they can use these letters to show constructive knowledge.

So, what should employers do if they receive a no-match letter?

  1. If a letter is received, don’t assume the worst. There may be a simple reason for the mismatch.  Remember, these letters are not providing any information regarding the employee’s employment authorization or immigration status.
  2. Communicate with the employee.  Let the employee know a letter was received and ask then to verify their information.  Give your employee a reasonable period of time to resolve the discrepancy with the SSA. SSA has provided a sample letter to give to employees.
  3. Follow up with your employee and review any documents that they may provide to you. Submit any employer or employee corrections to the SSA.

This year, ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations launched 6,848 worksite investigations. The number of employer I-9 audits has gone up from 1,360 to 5,891 (comparing fiscal year 2017 to 2018). As ICE ramps up their enforcement efforts in 2019, it is necessary for employers to create a plan to address no-match letters with their employees, as well as, making sure that their I-9s are compliant.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws, please contact Layli Eskandari Deal of the law firm of Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.