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FMG Law Blog Line

The SEC Seeks to Enhance the Quality and Transparency of Investors’ Relationships; Approves the Regulation Best Interest Rule

Posted on: June 17th, 2019

By: Joseph Suarez

On June 5, 2019, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) approved its Best Interest Rule (the “Rule”) package requiring broker-dealers, and investment advisors, to act in their retail clients’ “best interests.” The SEC states the Rule, “will impose a materially heightened standard of conduct for broker-dealers when serving retail clients.” Broker-dealers must begin complying with the new rule, and broker-dealers and investment advisers must prepare, deliver to retail investors, and file a “relationship summary” by June 30, 2020.

The Rule is designed to enhance investor protections while preserving retail investor access and choice in: (1) the type of professional with whom they work, (2) the services they receive, and (3) how they pay for these services. In order to satisfy the new best interest standard of care, a broker-dealer who makes recommendations to a retail customer must fulfill four obligations: 1) a “disclosure obligation”; 2) a “duty of care” obligation; 3) a “conflicts of interest” obligation; and, 4) a “compliance obligation.” The duty of care obligation requires a broker-dealer to exercise reasonable “diligence, care and skill” when making investment recommendations. This obligation is similar to FINRA’s suitability rules. In order to satisfy the best interest obligation, a broker-dealer must understand and communicate the “risk, rewards and costs of any recommendation;” have a reasonable basis to believe that the recommendation is in the best interest of the customer; and refrain from making “excessive” recommendations, given the customer’s investment profile.

Regardless of whether a retail investor chooses a broker-dealer or an investment adviser, the retail investor will be entitled to a recommendation (if (s)he chooses a broker-dealer) or advice (if (s)he uses an investment adviser) that is in the retail investor’s best interest and that does not place the interests of the firm or the financial professional ahead of the retail investor’s interests. Nonetheless, the Rule’s perceived uncertainty is cause for division. The SEC claims the Rule is designed to enhance the quality and transparency of retail investors’ relationships with broker-dealers and advisors. Proponents say the Rule will elevate the standard for what is considered an investor’s best interest, specifically, that broker-dealers will need to make substantial changes to enhance investor protection. Opponents argue the Rule is too vague and retains a muddled standard that will not change any practices in the brokerage industry.

Given the current uncertainty, the question becomes: will the Rule cause more litigation? Given the near immediate scrutiny, the answer may be in the affirmative. The Plaintiff’s Bar will likely argue that the Rule now provides customers with a higher standard of care than the suitability standard in furtherance of asserting claims against broker-dealers. In any event, the Rule’s lack of clarity will surely stir debate over the next year before its implementation.

For more information, please contact Joseph Suarez at [email protected].

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