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FMG Law Blog Line

California Lawyers Should Not Lie

Posted on: December 20th, 2019

By: Greg Fayard

It seems obvious, but lawyers shouldn’t lie. A new Rule of Professional Conduct applicable to California lawyers says that while representing a client, a lawyer shall not knowingly make a false statement of material fact or law to a third person.

Rule 4.1 is aimed at lawyers communicating with opposing counsel or an opposing party. This duty to not misrepresent facts or law to others includes a lawyer “agreeing” with statements he or she knows are false. For example, if a lawyer hears a factually untrue statement said in a court hearing, and orally agrees with that statement, knowing it is false, that verbal affirmation runs afoul of the rule.

However, if the lawyer remained silent after hearing the false statement, such silence would likely not violate the rule—as silence is not an affirmation. Of course, the best practice for all lawyers, in California and elsewhere, is to tell the truth, don’t lie to others, and correct statements that the lawyer knows are untrue, even if it may not necessarily help the client’s case.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Greg Fayard at [email protected], or any other member of our Lawyers Professional Liability Practice Group, a list of which can be found at www.fmglaw.com.

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