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FMG Law Blog Line

Posts Tagged ‘AARP’

Google, The Supremes & Cy Pres

Posted on: June 14th, 2018

By: Samantha Skolnick

At the end of April, the U.S. Supreme Court accepted a certiorari petition in the case Frank v. Gaos, No. 17-961, 2018 WL 324121 (U.S. Apr. 30, 2018). The Supreme Court will determine if a class-action settlement involving Google met federal law requirements when $5.3 million of the $8.5 million settlement fund was given to outside groups. The question presented: “Whether, or in what circumstances, a cy pres award of class action proceeds that provides no direct relief to class members supports class certification and comports with the requirement that a settlement binding class member must be ‘fair, reasonable, and adequate.’”

Cy pres is a doctrine where the original objective of the settlor or testator becomes impracticable, impossible and in some instances illegal to perform. Cy pres allows the Court to alter terms of the charitable trust to get as close to the original intention of the testator or settlor as to allow the trust to remain and not flounder.

The core issue in this case is whether this settlement complied with Rule 23(e)(2) which sets the requirement that proposed class action settlements be “fair, reasonable and adequate.” In certain class action situations, funds can be unclaimed when the members claims are small or the process is difficult. To prevent the unclaimed amounts from entering the defendant’s pocket, the money can be directed to other causes, charities and foundations.

Here, the class action stems from allegations that web browsers disclosed Google searches to third-party websites. Three of the named plaintiffs received $15,000 incentive awards, and the rest of the class received nothing. The cy pres award was allegedly given to organizations who promised to use the money to protect internet privacy.  The cy pres recipients included:  World Privacy Forum; Carnegie Mellon University; the Center for Information, Society and Policy at Chicago-Kent College of Law; the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University; the Stanford Center for Internet and Society; and AARP. According to the cert petition, class members that were absent received “no relief at all in exchange for their claims—no money, no alteration of the defendant’s allegedly injurious conduct, not even coupons.”

The implications of this decision and how settlement funds are distributed particularly in class actions can be huge. Class actions span from internet privacy to self-driving cars to the on-going tobacco litigation. For now, we wait and see.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Samantha Skolnick at [email protected].

DOJ Fails to Challenge 5th Circuit Ruling Striking Fiduciary Rule

Posted on: May 3rd, 2018

By: Theodore C. Peters

On March 15, 2018, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal stuck down the “fiduciary rule” proposed by the Department of Labor (DOL), which required brokers to act in the best interests of their clients in retirement accounts.  Subsequently, there was much speculation as to whether the Department of Justice (DOJ), acting on behalf of the DOL, would appeal that decision.  The April 30, 2018 deadline for the DOJ to appeal came and went, but …. nothing.  The Fifth Circuit’s ruling, therefore, is slotted to take effect on May 7, 2018.

In late April, AARP and several state attorneys general (including California, New York and Oregon) joined forces in seeking the court’s permission to intervene as defendants in the case, and also sought an en banc hearing before the entire 17-judge circuit. AARP contends that the court’s decision striking down the DOL rule puts Americans’ retirement security at substantial risk, resulting in an “issue of exceptional importance.”  The plaintiffs in the case, opponents of the DOL rule, formally opposed the motions to intervene on April 30.  Counsel for the plaintiffs charged that the “last-minute motions do not come close to justifying their unprecedented bid to intervene…”

On May 2, the Fifth Circuit denied the intervenors’ motions.  The court’s decision looks to be the final nail in the coffin holding the DOL’s fiduciary rule.  Despite this ruling, however, the DOL still has one more card it could play – it can file a petition by June 13 to have the Supreme Court hear the case. Even if the DOL stands quietly by and does nothing, the Supreme Court could conceivably take the case up on its own.

Ultimately, this legal brouhaha focuses attention on the SEC, which is currently taking public comment on newly proposed standards of conduct for brokers and advisors.

If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Ted Peters at [email protected].