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Posts Tagged ‘American Arbitration Association’

Arbitration Agreements in New Jersey Need More Details

Posted on: November 16th, 2018

By: Chris Curci

On November 13, 2018, the Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division, issued an important decision holding that an arbitration agreement between the employer and employee was not enforceable. Flanzman v. Jenny Craig, Inc., Docket No. L-6238-17.  The arbitration agreement read:

Any and all claims or controversies arising out of or relating to [plaintiff’s] employment, the termination thereof, or otherwise arising between [plaintiff] and [defendant] shall, in lieu of a jury or other civil trial, be settled by final and binding arbitration. This agreement to arbitrate includes all claims whether arising in tort or contract and whether arising under statute or common law including, but not limited to, any claim of breach of contract, discrimination or harassment of any kind.

According to the Appellate Division, this agreement was unenforceable because it “failed to identify the general process for selecting an arbitration mechanism.” What exactly does that mean?

In its effort to clarify this standard, the Appellate Division stated that an employer is not required to “detail in the arbitration agreement the exact manner in which the arbitration” will proceed. However, an employer must identify the “forum” for the arbitration and clearly explain how the employee’s judicial rights to a jury trial are being replaced by the arbitration rights.

For example, the Court noted that it would be sufficient for an employer to (1) identify a forum such as the American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) or the Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services (“JAMS”), and (2) adopt that forum’s rules and procedures. The Court opined that this would be sufficient because AAA and JAMS’s rules and procedures address numerous procedural issues, such as: (1) notification requirements, (2) how to initiate proceedings, (3) management conferences, (4) discovery, (5) the location of the hearings, (6) the number of arbitrators, (7) how to communicate with the arbitrator, (8) attendance requirements, (9) dispositive motions, (10) evidence, (11) modification of awards, (12) and applications for fees, expenses and costs.

In other words, while the arbitration agreement is not required to “detail the exact manner in which the arbitration will proceed,” an employer must specifically identify a forum such as AAA or JAMS and incorporate that forum’s rules and procedures. This allows the employee to fully understand how his or her judicial rights to a jury trial are being replaced by arbitration.

Employers should review their employee arbitration agreements to ensure their enforceability. If you need help with this or any other employment related question, Chris Curci practices Labor & Employment law in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and is a member of Freeman Mathis & Gary’s Labor and Employment Law National Practice Section. He represents employers in litigation and advises clients on all aspects of employment law. He can be reached at [email protected].

Using Summary Judgment during the Arbitration Process

Posted on: February 22nd, 2018

By: Erin E. Lamb

Many attorneys assume that once a case is in private arbitration, dispositive motions are against the rules and are no longer a useful tool to resolve cases. How could an arbitrator have the power to consider a dispositive motion? After all, arbitration is sold to all parties as a process that all parties must willingly opt into — in the interest of limiting the complexities of arbitration, not adding to them, as dispositive motions do. Most attorneys participating in arbitration therefore would never think of pursuing dispositive motions, even when faced with res judicata or statute of limitations issues.

This is an incorrect and unduly limiting view of the arbitration process. None other than the Supreme Court of the United States, has upheld the power of an arbitrator to adopt procedures necessary to give effect to the parties’ arbitration agreement. Stolt-Neilsen v. AnimalFeeds International, 559 U.S. 663 (2010).  It’s up to the arbitrator to determine procedural questions by looking at the arbitration agreement. In turn, most arbitration agreements invoke an arbitration providers’ rules. Most rules, including the most recent American Arbitration Association rules (last updated in 2009), indirectly give arbitrators expansive powers and wide latitude in the procedures used to give effect to the arbitration agreement.

The 2009 American Arbitration Association rules, still in effect ten years later, state that arbitrators are required to “take such steps as they may deem necessary or desirable to avoid delay and to achieve just, speedy, and cost-effective resolution of large, complex, commercial cases.” In fact, in AAA commercial cases, the rules directly address dispositive motions: “The arbitrator may allow the filing of and make rulings upon a dispositive motion only if the arbitrator determines that the moving party has shown that the motion is likely to succeed and dispose of or narrow the issues in the case.” The use of “only” makes the rule seem limiting; in reality, it directly gives arbitrators the ability to hear and rule on said motions. Multiple federal courts have affirmed arbitration awards where the arbitrator ruled on a motion for summary judgment or on summary disposition. Some arbitration provider’s rules even specifically allow for it – the JAMS rules specifically allow for the filing of dispositive motions even under objection from the other side.

Simply put, unless your arbitration agreement specifically, plainly, and expressly prohibits dispositive motions, an arbitrator is empowered to grant any relief necessary to reach a final determination of the matter, including dispositive motions. Only in the face of a specific written agreement would an arbitrator be acting outside the contractually delegated authority of the arbitration agreement. This is an important thing to consider for all attorneys in arbitration cases – and at the time of the agreement to arbitrate, not after.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Erin Lamb at [email protected].