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Posts Tagged ‘Attorney Fee’

Insuring Against Rule 68 Offers of Settlement

Posted on: June 28th, 2018

By: Matt Grattan

One tool defense lawyers in Georgia frequently use to induce settlements is an offer of settlement under O.C.G.A. 9-11-68.   Rule 68 allows either party to a tort action to serve a written offer to settle the claim, so long as the offer is made within a certain time and satisfies several other elements under the statute.  If a Rule 68 offer is properly made by a defendant and rejected, that code section allows a defendant to recover its post-rejection attorney’s fees and expenses from a plaintiff in the event the plaintiff does not recover at least 75% of the offered amount at trial.

It is easy to see how the fee-shifting provision in Rule 68 can provide defense attorneys with leverage during settlement negotiations.  Simply put, it forces plaintiffs to put some skin in the game.  Because paying the defendant’s attorney’s fees and costs can significantly reduce or even eliminate a plaintiffs’ award at trial (and in turn a plaintiffs’ attorneys’ fees), plaintiffs may be more inclined to settle rather than face such risks at trial.

The fee-shifting benefit from Rule 68, however, could potentially be diminished by companies like LegalFeeGuard.   Established in Florida in 2012 to combat that state’s offer of settlement statute, LegalFeeGuard has recently started offering insurance policies in Georgia that cover attorney’s fees and costs under O.C.G.A. 9-11-68.  LegalFeeGuard offers no-deductible policies with limits as low as $10,000 and as high as $250,000.   Policies are triggered by a judgment in a bench trial or the return of a verdict in a jury trial, and are available to plaintiffs and defendants for a wide array of cases, including personal injury, breach of contract, and intentional torts.

What does the availability of fee-shifting insurance mean for defense lawyers and their clients?  LegalFeeGuard recently launched in Georgia (and the author is unaware of any other similar companies), so it is tough at this point to determine what kind of impact fee-shifting insurance will have on litigation in Georgia.  But this is certainly a development for lawyers to keep an eye on (particularly since LegalFeeGuard claims on its website to have sold over 1,000 policies in Florida) as such insurance may persuade more plaintiffs to roll the dice and take their case to trial knowing the downside risk of paying fees and costs is reduced, if not altogether eliminated.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Matt Grattan at [email protected].

Show Me the Money! Georgia Court of Appeals Affirms HOA’s Right to Recover Attorneys Fees

Posted on: January 31st, 2018

By: Cheryl H. Shaw

Community associations are funded through assessments paid by property owners. When owners fail to pay, the association’s ability to meet financial obligations and provide for upkeep of the community is diminished.  Common area repairs and replacements don’t go away just because the association’s bank account is lean, and maintenance projects get more expensive when delayed. Owners who pay their assessments end up subsidizing those who do not, while delinquent owners continue to enjoy the benefits of the association.  Pursuing delinquent property owners in court can be a long, arduous, and expensive process. However, the Georgia Court of Appeals recently affirmed an association’s right to recover attorney fees incurred in that effort, making the process a little less painful.

In Summit at Scarborough Homeowners Ass’n v. Williams, 343 Ga. App. 343 (2017), an HOA sought to recover its court costs and attorney fees after obtaining judgment against a property owner for unpaid annual assessments. The trial court denied the motion and the HOA appealed, asserting it was entitled to the fees under a provision of the recorded Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, Restrictions and Easements which stated:

The annual and special assessments [imposed by the Declaration], together with late charges, simple interest at the rate of twelve percent (12%) per annum, court costs, and attorneys’ fees incurred to enforce or collect such assessments, shall be an equitable charge and a continuing lien upon the property against which each such assessment is made and shall also be the personal obligation of the person who is the record owner of the property at the time the assessment fell due.

Siding with the HOA and reversing the trial court’s order, the Court of Appeals reiterated that under Georgia law, the Declaration of a homeowners’ association is considered a binding contract: “Where parties contract for the recovery of attorney fees, a trial court does not have the authority to alter that arrangement unless it is prohibited by statute.”  Finding no statute that prohibited recovery of fees in this context, the Court held the Declaration obligated the property owner to pay the HOA the reasonable attorney fees incurred in its collection efforts.  The Court reversed the trial court’s order and remanded the case with instructions to enter an award of costs and fees consistent with the Declaration. Id.

The Williams case confirms Georgia courts will enforce an HOA’s right to recover attorney fees if clearly set forth in the recorded declaration. Making sure your association has the right language in its governing documents is critical.  Cheryl H. Shaw is licensed in Georgia and has successfully represented community associations and property management companies in all manner of claims, including consultation concerning governing documents and daily business operations.  If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Ms. Shaw at [email protected].