CLOSE X
RSS Feed LinkedIn Instagram Twitter Facebook
Search:
FMG Law Blog Line

Posts Tagged ‘California Labor Code’

AB5: California’s Controversial Gig-Work Law Took Effect January 1, 2020

Posted on: January 7th, 2020

By:  Margot Parker

As of January 1, 2020, California’s AB5 may require employers to reclassify hundreds of thousands of independent contractors as employees with broad labor law protections.  The new law codifies the “ABC test” adopted by the California Supreme Court in Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles in 2018.  Under the ABC test, a worker may only be classified as an independent contractor if it can be shown that:

A. The worker is free from the control and direction of the hiring entity, both under the contract for the performance of work and in fact;

B. The worker performs work that is outside of the usual course of the hiring entity’s business, and

C. The worker is engaged in independently established trade, occupation, or business that is of the same nature as the work performed for the hiring entity.

This strict three-pronged test now applies to the requirements of the California Labor Code and the California Unemployment Insurance Code.  Beginning July 1, 2020, it will also apply to the California Workers Compensation Code.

While the law provides exemptions for certain occupations and industries (including accountants, architects, dentists, insurance brokers, lawyers, and engineers), the Legislature declined to exempt app-based ride services and food delivery companies, whose workers complain they often earn less than minimum wage.  Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, Postmates and Instacart are mounting a ballot initiative to exempt their workers, while trucking associations, photographers, and freelance journalists have brought other initiatives opposing the law.

Given such controversy, the law’s author intends to introduce additional legislation to clarify AB5 this year.  In the meantime, employers should consult with legal counsel and review independent contractor classifications to ensure proper classification of workers pursuant to the ABC test.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Margot Parker at [email protected].

California Appellate Court Concludes That Employer Lawfully Rounded Employee Time Up and Down

Posted on: July 12th, 2018

By: Laura Flynn

The Second District of the California Court of Appeal has ruled that calculating payroll by automatically rounding workers’ hours either up or down to the nearest quarter-hour is legal as long as it does not result in workers being systematically underpaid over time. In a published opinion, the three-judge panel found the payroll system implemented by a Southern California hospital system was neutral both on its face and in the way it was applied.

Under the employer’s payroll system, an hourly worker who clocked in between 6:53 and 7:07, was paid as if they clocked in at 7:00.  Meal breaks that lasted between 23 and 37 minutes were rounded to 30 minutes.  The legality of the calculation method was challenged by two former employees who alleged they weren’t paid properly or given adequate meal breaks or rest periods.  The primary allegation was that the rounding system did not comply with the California Labor Code because it did not use employees’ exact clock-in and clock-out times.

A statistical expert analyzed the time records for all of the hospital employees over a four-year period.  Although some employees lost work time, the remainder either gained time or broke even. Overall, the calculation method resulted in the employer over compensating employees.  The Appellate Court held a rounding system is valid if it “average[s] out sufficiently,” rejecting claims that minor discrepancies in an individual employee’s wage calculations establish that the employee is entitled to assert a claim for underpayment.

The Court relied on Section 785.48 of title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations which allows employers to round work time as long as it doesn’t result in workers being underpaid over statistically significant periods of time. California’s Division of Labor Standards Enforcement has adopted the federal regulation as part of its enforcement standards.  The Court’s opinion confirms Section 785.48 and the policies underlying it “apply equally to the employee-protective policies embodied in California labor law.”

AHMC Healthcare, Inc. v. Superior Court, filed 6/25/18, Los Angeles Superior Court Case No. B285655.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Laura Flynn at [email protected].