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Posts Tagged ‘financing’

Cancelling a Financed Policy: Reliance on a Power of Attorney

Posted on: February 8th, 2019

By: Eric Benedict

When a prospective insured is applying for and obtaining coverage, no matter the type of risk, the cost of the premiums is likely to be a foremost concern. To cover the cost of the premium, an insured may choose to seek financing from third-party entities known as premium financing companies. In exchange for agreed upon terms, premium financing companies will pay all or part of the premium due, with expectation that the insured will pay back the loan over time. In an effort to reduce the risk that the premium finance company will suffer a loss as a result of the insured’s default, premium financing companies often require that the insured grant the company a power of attorney to cancel the policy on the insured’s behalf and collect any returned premium in the event of a default. Both the terms of a policy and relevant legal authorities may set forth different requirements for cancellation when the policy is cancelled by the insured than when it is cancelled by the insurer.

As a result of the relationship established between the premium finance company and the insured, an insurer is often placed in the position of receiving a notice of cancellation from the premium finance company on behalf of the insured. In many states, premium finance companies are subject to regulation and some states have set forth specific procedures that a premium finance company must follow when exercising a power of attorney to cancel a policy on the insured’s behalf. To provide certainty to the insurer regardless of whether the premium finance company has complied with statutory or regulatory requirements prior to cancellation, some statutory schemes also provide insurers the ability to rely on representations and cancellations from premium finance companies. Many of the states which have adopted such schemes provide specific conditions under which an insurer is entitled to rely on a notice of cancellation from a premium finance company, thereby shielding the insurer from liability after it cancels a financed policy at the direction of the premium finance company. While many of these schemes contain similar language, the circumstances and conditions under which an insurer may properly rely varies by jurisdiction.

Ultimately, although an insured’s ability to finance an insurance premium may have the effect of widening access to coverage to those who require financing, it is imperative that both the premium finance company and the insured understand their rights and obligations under the relevant statutory scheme. Similarly, it is critical that insurers understand the relevant legal authorities concerning its rights and responsibilities when dealing with an insurance premium finance company which exercises its right to cancel a party on behalf of the insured.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Eric Benedict at [email protected].