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Posts Tagged ‘Pandemic’

Statute of Limitations Tolled in California Amid Pandemic

Posted on: August 3rd, 2020

By: Matthew Jones

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, California’s Governor Gavin Newsom issued a “state of emergency” for the entire State. In response, the California Judicial Council adopted several Emergency Rules to implement during the pandemic. In particular, Rule 9 states that all statute of limitations for civil causes of action are tolled from April 6, 2020 until 90 days after the state of emergency related to COVID-19 is lifted by the Governor. Therefore, if a party’s claim would have expired pursuant to the applicable statute of limitations during this timeframe, such claims are still very much alive. In regard to those claims, there is currently no deadline to file them since the “state of emergency” has yet to be lifted by the Governor. Once lifted, claimants will have six months to file their respective claims.

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

Hurricanes, Pandemics, and Shortages, Oh My: Considerations for Hurricane Season in the Time of Coronavirus

Posted on: June 18th, 2020

By: Anastasia Osbrink

According to forecasters with the Climate Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”), a division of the National Weather Service, the 2020 hurricane season has a 60% chance of being an “above-normal season.” (See https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/busy-atlantic-hurricane-season-predicted-for-2020.)

This forecast is based on several factors. According to the NOAA, there are “warmer-than-average sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea,” including record high temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico. That “coupled with reduced vertical wind shear, weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds, and an enhanced west African monsoon all increase the likelihood for an above-normal Atlantic hurricane season.” Hurricanes are formed when “a weather disturbance, such as a thunderstorm, that pulls in warm surface air from all directions” combines with “water at the ocean’s surface that is at least 80° Fahrenheit.” (https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/hurricanes.html.) Warm sea water gives hurricanes their strength. Therefore, the warmer the seawater, the more fuel they get, and the stronger these storms can become. Additionally, hurricanes lose strength if high-altitude winds shear apart the top of the storm. Hence, reduced vertical wind shear and weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds will also enable stronger storms to form. (https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/hurricanes.html.) Regarding the fourth of these conditions, a stronger west African monsoon season “allows wind patterns coming off Africa to more easily spin up storms.” (https://www.noaa.gov/stories/whirlwind-of-atlantic-hurricane-season-what-gives.) Additionally, as the NOAA explains, “El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions are expected to either remain neutral or to trend toward La Nina, meaning there will not be an El Nino present to suppress hurricane activity.” (https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/busy-atlantic-hurricane-season-predicted-for-2020.) The NOAA notes that when “similar conditions” have been present in the past, they have produced more active seasons than when these conditions are not present. In fact, this is the first time since records of hurricanes have been kept where there were three named storms before the official start of hurricane season on June 1st.

There is, though, another factor that will have an impact during this season’s hurricanes and storms – Coronavirus and COVID-19 – for several reasons.

First, during these initial months of response to Coronavirus and COVID-19, staples like toilet paper, water, disinfectants, and first-aid items often have been out of stock at stores and online. With storms heading their way, certain population centers will have to respond to the inevitable rush for food, bottled water, and other crucial supplies.

Second, many people living along the Southeastern Seaboard and the Gulf Coast rely on various businesses that provide hurricane preparation and storage services, such as window boarding, sandbagging, and securing of personal property. With many businesses struggling to remain open or maintain their workforce due to the pandemic, such services may be more difficult to find.

Third, if people have to head to evacuation centers, which are enclosed spaces crowded with people, the virus and COVID-19 may be more likely to spread.

Finally, as cities and states respond, they will need to put more time, effort, and resources into planning and setting up these centers to ensure social distancing can be practiced. One solution is more centers with more volunteers. Additional personal protective equipment (“PPE”) will be needed such as extra masks, gloves, hand sanitizer, and washing stations.

Some of the resources available to respond to these risks are provided in the following links:

https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

https://www.fema.gov/news-release/2020/06/01/prepare-2020-hurricane-season-now

https://www.weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Anastasia Osbrink at [email protected].

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients. Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments. For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER: The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19. The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement. We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG. An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you. We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such. We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

FINRA In-Person Hearings Further Postponed Until July 31

Posted on: May 20th, 2020

By: Kathleen Cusack and Kirsten Patzer

On Friday, May 15, 2020, amidst continued concern over the potential spread of COVID-19, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) postponed all in-person arbitration and mediation proceedings until July 31, 2020. FINRA initially postponed in-person meetings beginning in March and extended the suspension several times. 

In its most recent announcement, FINRA also offered to waive the postponement fee if parties agree to reschedule in-person hearings currently scheduled between July 31 and September 4, 2020. All other case deadlines continue to apply. 

As an alternative to in-person meetings, videoconferencing or telephonic meetings are permissible if requested by parties or if mandated by arbitrators. This option is reportedly unpopular and infrequently utilized. And when it has been utilized, the outcomes are subject to scrutiny and may lead to awards being overturned.

A recent FINRA award has resulted in Wunderlich Securities, Inc. filing an action in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York asking that the $11.4 million award issued against them in March be vacated after the final hearing was held via Zoom. According to Wunderlich, the panel had been inattentive throughout the entire proceeding, held over the course of 9 sessions, with the final session being the only one not held in person. During the Zoom videoconference, one arbitrator would look at other screens, typing, and eating during testimony, another arbitrator completely blocked her screen, and during closing arguments, one of the panelists completely walked away from his screen. After the final hearing Wunderlich filed a motion requesting that the panel recuse itself. That motion was unanimously denied by the panel.

The original FINRA arbitration was Dominick & Dickerman LLC, Michael John Campbell v. Wunderlich Securities, Inc., available here. The Petition to Vacate for that case, available here.  

If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Kirsten Patzer at [email protected] or Kathleen Cusack at [email protected]

Additional Information:

The FMG Coronavirus Task Team will be conducting a series of webinars on Coronavirus issues on a regular basis.  Click here to view upcoming webinars.

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

Requests for Compassionate Release in the Era of COVID-19

Posted on: May 4th, 2020

By: Curt Graham

Correctional facilities across the country are facing unique challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some facilities have already reduced inmate populations in an effort to curb its effects. Additionally, courts are receiving an unprecedented number of requests for early release or modified sentences. A recent opinion from the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky examined an inmate’s request for a compassionate release due to coronavirus concerns.

In United States v. Cornett, No. 7:10-2-KKC, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 68878 (E.D. Ky. Apr. 20, 2020), an inmate filed an emergency motion for immediate release and argued his correctional institution was not taking adequate steps to protect prisoners from the virus. His motion was denied, as the Court found the inmate had not exhausted his administrative rights under the First Step Act of 2018. The First Step Act permits prisoners to file a motion for compassionate release on their own (as opposed to the Bureau of Prisons filing one on their behalf), but only if the prisoner has first “fully exhausted all administrative rights to appeal a failure of the Bureau of Prisons to bring a motion on the defendant’s behalf or if 30 days have lapsed since the warden of the defendant’s facility received the defendant’s request to file a motion on his behalf, whichever is earlier.”). Finding the exhaustion requirements were jurisdictional, the Court rejected the argument that these requirements should be waived in light of the dangers posed by COVID-19.

The Cornett opinion emphasized that in these unsettling times, “the exhaustion requirement of the compassionate release statute is perhaps most important,” because the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is better positioned than the courts to first assess issues such as a defendant’s health, the adequacy of the measures taken by a particular place of incarceration to address any health risks, the risk presented to the public by a defendant’s release, and the adequacy of a defendant’s release plan.” The Court also observed that the BOP has begun a review of all inmates who have COVID-19 risk factors to determine which inmates are suitable for home confinement.

Given the ongoing COVID-19 concerns, courts will undoubtedly be flooded with similar requests for early release. However, statutory exhaustion requirements may bar such requests before they are ever heard on their merits. 

FMG attorneys Wesley Jackson, Ashley Hobson and Curt Graham will be presenting a webinar on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 from 1:00 – 2:15 p.m. EST entitled “COVID-19 in Custody: Practical Tips and Liability Considerations.” They will be joined by Edward Sweeney of Sweeney Corrections Consulting. This webinar will offer an in-depth discussion of the CDC Guidance on Management of COVID-19 in Correctional and Detention Facilities and will address various legal considerations relating to COVID-19 in the correctional setting.

Additional Information:

The FMG Coronavirus Task Team will be conducting a series of webinars on Coronavirus issues on a regular basis. Topics include real estate issues, protecting business interruption losses, and more. Click here to view upcoming webinars.

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

Governor Kemp Issues Executive Order Reopening Certain Businesses in Georgia

Posted on: April 22nd, 2020

By: Andrew Kim

On April 20, 2020, Governor Kemp signed an Executive Order that will impact certain businesses in Georgia. The new Executive Order reopens some businesses previously closed due to the Coronavirus pandemic and removes certain restrictions for other types of businesses as well.

Here are some key provisions:

Health-Related Practices and Services Not Subject to Minimum Basic Operations Restrictions:

The following practices and services are not subject to the Minimum Basic Operations restrictions. Instead, these practices and services “should consider implementing the operational guidelines provided in Executive Order 04.02.20.01 for Critical Infrastructure:”

  • Medical practices
  • Dental practices
  • Orthodontics practices
  • Optometry practices
  • Physical therapists
  • Ambulatory Surgical Centers
  • Physicians performing elective surgeries
  • Healthcare Institutions
  • Medical Facilities
  • Any and all other healthcare-related practices and services that have elected to cease operations because of the spread of COVID-19.

The Executive Order urges these practices and services begin treating patients as soon as possible in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines, and the provisions of his April 20, 2020 Executive Order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Reopening of Certain Businesses Effective April 24, 2020:

The Executive Order reopens the following businesses on Friday, April 24, 2020:

  • Gyms
  • Fitness Centers
  • Bowling Alleys
  • Body Art Studios
  • Businesses registered pursuant to Code Sections 43-10-11 and 43-10-18
    • Beauty Shops
    • Beauty Salons
    • Barber Shops
    • Schools of Cosmetology
    • Schools of Hair Design
    • Schools of Esthetics
    • Schools of Nail Care
    • Schools of Barbering
  • Individuals who, for compensation, engage in the practice of esthetics (massages, trims, dyeing, etc.), or cosmetic skincare.
  • Hair Designers
  • Persons who practice Massage Therapy

However, these businesses must implement the following in-person Minimum Basic Operations in order to reopen:

  1. Screening and evaluating workers who exhibit signs of illness, such as a fever over 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, cough, or shortness of breath;
  2. Requiring workers who exhibit signs of illness to not report to work or to seek medical attention;
  3. Enhancing sanitation of the workplace as appropriate;
  4. Requiring hand washing or sanitation by workers at appropriate places within the business location;
  5. Providing personal protective equipment as available and appropriate to the function and location of the worker within the business location;
  6. Prohibiting gatherings of workers during working hours;
  7. Permitting workers to take breaks and lunch outside, in their office or personal workspace, or in such other areas where proper social distancing is attainable;
  8. Implementing teleworking for all possible workers;
  9. Implementing staggered shifts for all possible workers;
  10. Holding all meetings and conferences virtually, wherever possible;
  11. Delivering intangible services remotely wherever possible;
  12. Discouraging workers from using other workers’ phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment;
  13. Prohibiting handshaking and other unnecessary person-to-person contact in the workplace;
  14. Placing notices that encourage hand hygiene at the entrance to the workplace and in other workplace areas where they are likely to be seen;
  15. Suspending the use of Personal Identification Number (PIN) pads, PIN entry devices, electronic signature capture, and any other credit card receipt signature requirements to the extent such suspension is permitted by agreements with credit card companies and credit agencies;
  16. Enforcing social distancing for non-cohabitating persons on their property;
  17. For retailers and service providers, providing for alternative points of sale outside of buildings, including curbside pickup or delivery of products and/or services if an alternative point of sale is permitted under Georgia law;
  18. Increasing physical space between workers and customers;
  19. Providing disinfectant and sanitation products for workers to clean their workspace, equipment, and tools; and
  20. Increasing physical space between workers’ worksites to at least six (6) feet.

The April 20, 2020 Executive Order includes the same language and restrictions from the previous April 2, 2020 Executive Order. This language and restriction states that all businesses, non-profits, and county and municipal governments, other than those defined as “Critical Infrastructure,” shall restrict gatherings to ten (10) individuals at a single location if “such gathering requires persons to stand or be seated within six (6) feet of any other person.”

Reopening of Other Businesses Effective April 27, 2020:

Governor Kemp’s April 20, 2020 Executive Order does not include any provisions that reopen or lift restrictions for:

  • Restaurant dine-in services;
  • Private Social Clubs; and
  • Theaters

However, during his press conference on April 20, 2020, Governor Kemp announced that the above businesses will be allowed to reopen on Monday, April 27, 2020, should those businesses comply with specific social distancing and sanitation mandates. The Governor’s Office will be issuing these additional mandates for these businesses in the next few days.

Governor Kemp stated in his press conference that the following businesses will remain closed:

  • Bars
  • Nightclubs
  • Operators of Amusement Park Rides
  • Live Performance Venues

So What Next?

Employers that are planning on reopening their business based on Governor Kemp’s April 20, 2020 Order should immediately begin assessing the health and safety protocols they have in place now for employees and what additional steps they need to take to implement the protocols identified by the April 20 Order.  Further, we recommend that employers consult with their counsel to evaluate any industry or location-specific measures that should be taken to reduce any concerns by customers of contracting COVID-19 when visiting the employer’s establishment. 

Additional Information:

The FMG Coronavirus Task Team will be conducting a series of webinars on Coronavirus issues on a regular basis. Topics include returning to the workplace, business interruption coverage and more. Click here to view upcoming webinars.

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**