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FMG Law Blog Line

Posts Tagged ‘sensors’

Many Drivers Don’t Appreciate Limitations of Driver Assistance Technologies

Posted on: September 28th, 2018

By: Wes Jackson

Pump the breaks, George Jetson! While car technology is quickly advancing towards autonomous vehicles, we aren’t there yet. Even so, a recent study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety suggests many drivers overestimate the abilities of new driver assistance technologies, which could lead to unsafe driving habits.

The study examined drivers’ attitudes toward and interactions with “advanced driver assistance systems,” or ADAS. Anyone who has recently purchased a new car is likely familiar with many of the latest ADAS technologies such as forward collision warning, automatic emergency breaking, lane departure warning, lane keeping assist, blind spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, and adaptive cruise control.

While the study found that most drivers trusted and used these ADAS features, it also revealed that most drivers do not appreciate their limitations. For example, only 21% of owners of vehicles with blind spot monitoring knew that such systems could not detect vehicles passing at a high rate of speed. Similarly, only a third of owners of vehicles with automatic breaking systems knew the systems relied on cameras and sensors that could be compromised by dirt or other debris.

What’s worse, some drivers with ADAS systems admitted to adopting unsafe driving habits in response to the new technologies. For instance, 29% of respondents to the study reported feeling comfortable engaging in other activities while using adaptive cruise control. Similarly, 30% of respondents admitted to relying exclusively on their blind spot monitoring system without checking their blind spots, and 25% of respondents admitted to backing up without looking over their shoulder when using a rear cross-traffic alert system.

These new ADAS technologies can certainly help motorists driver more safely. However, drivers should not succumb to the illusion that these new technologies made alert driving a thing of the past. Until we’re all flying around in autonomous space-age vehicles, be sure to keep your eyes on the road and always look twice before backing up or changing lanes.

The Transportation Law Team at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP is on the cutting edge of autonomous vehicle issues. If you have any questions about the AAA Foundation’s report or issues concerning autonomous vehicles, please contact Wes Jackson at [email protected].

Smart Cities Face Hacking Threat

Posted on: August 15th, 2018

By: Ze’eva Kushner

As you sit in traffic, frustrated and wondering why the city or municipality cannot do something to ease congestion, know that a city’s use of internet-connected technology to make your commute better may also invite hackers to wreak havoc on your city.

Traffic is just one of many problems that “smart cities” use internet-connected technology to address.  A smart city can set up an array of sensors and integrate their data to monitor things like air quality, water levels, radiation, and the electrical grid.  That data then can be used to automatically inform fundamental services like traffic and street lights and emergency alerts.

Smart city technology provides many benefits to city management, including connectivity and ease of management.  However, these very same features make the technology an attractive target for hackers.  In a recently released white paper, IBM revealed 17 vulnerabilities in smart city systems around the world.  Some of these risks were as simple as failing to change default passwords that could be guessed easily, bugs that could allow an attacker to inject malicious software commands, and others that would allow an attacker to sidestep authentication checks.  Additionally, use of the open internet rather than an internal city network to connect sensors or relay data to the cloud presents an opportunity for hackers.

Atlanta is an example of a smart city that is attempting to improve its efficiency by employing smart city technology, with its focus being mobility, public safety, environment, city operations efficiency, and public and business engagement.  Atlanta knows all too well how crippling a hack can be, as it suffered from the ransomware attack in the Spring that kept residents from services such as paying their water bills or traffic tickets online.  The hacking threat to smart cities is real and significant.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Ze’eva Kushner at [email protected].