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Posts Tagged ‘state bar’

Top 10 Tips For Taking the State Bar

Posted on: July 1st, 2019

We’ve asked our attorneys for their advice for taking the bar.  Here are our top 10 tips.

  1. Start studying early and create a study schedule.

This can be difficult to do with law school, but if you have a free weekend and some time to catch up on a subject you think you have weaknesses in, this is a great opportunity for you to solidify your foundation for that subject. It doesn’t have to be a full-fledged study session. Read an outline, do some practice questions, anything!

  1. Treat studying like a full-time DAY job.

Don’t study into all hours of the night. Leave time for relaxation and leisure on the weekends so you don’t go crazy. Along the same lines, stay healthy. Get as much sleep as possible, exercise, and take time to prepare nutritious meals.

  1. Focus on what has worked well and been effective for you up to this point.

For most people, sticking to a tried-and-true study method will serve them well during bar prep instead of trying out all sorts of different “fad” study strategies, which may be more distracting than helpful.

Also, don’t be afraid to deviate from the bar company’s study plan if you know a different approach works better for you – trust yourself, be consistent in doing the work, and make honest evaluations about your progress as you go along to identify your strengths and weaknesses.

  1. Select a great prep course.

Barbri is pretty good. Their lectures are a bit long, but worth it. The essay practice seminars are EXTREMELY important. Do not neglect. AdaptiBar is another good one to use. Bar Secrets is helpful for essay questions.  Dr. Saccuzzo has REPEATEDLY successfully predicted the essay questions on the bar. The predictions are free. Bar Secrets is very helpful with essay questions.

  1. Learn to be REALLY hard on yourself.

Read sample answers. Learn to grade objectively so you can grade your own essays without bias.

  1. Practice your time management now. 

Do not go over on time for any essay or the performance test on test day.  Do not get bogged down on a handful of MBE questions.  It is not worth it.  Give each part of the exam your full attention.  Complete the task in front of you and then move on.  Don’t look ahead and don’t look back.  Just put one foot in front of the other and march to the finish line.

  1. Make logistical preparations to ensure your testing experience goes smoothly.

Visit the bar exam location before test day to get familiar with the area.  Put together your pencils, pens, and other testing materials.  Make plans for getting to the exam, packing lunch, etc.  Choose your lodging carefully!  Make sure you have a comfortable, quiet place to stay each nigh within walking distance, or with convenient and easy access to the exam location.  Pack a healthy lunch so you won’t have to fight the crowds or stress during break time.  Have ear plugs on hand.  Make sure you have a reliable laptop and don’t forget your charger!

  1. This is an issue spotting exam.

You can’t get points if you don’t find the issue.  When you are reviewing model answers pay as much attention to the issue outline as you do the rule statements and analysis paragraphs.  This will help you see what issues are grouped together so you don’t miss anything.

  1. Be sure to also give yourself time to unwind and rest at the end of each day after your studies.

Managing stress levels and avoiding burnout are as critical as learning the material itself, and allowing yourself sufficient rest also helps with retaining all the material you’ve been studying.

  1. Just push through and stay positive!

 

 

California Attorneys Who Fail to Comply with the State Bar Re-Fingerprinting Rule Risk Monetary Penalties and License Suspension

Posted on: April 30th, 2019

By: Paige Pembrook

April 30, 2019 marks the initial deadline for California attorneys to comply with California Rules of Court, Rule 9.9.5—the rule that requires attorneys to re-submit fingerprints to the State Bar so the Bar can obtain records regarding attorney arrests and convictions.  Attorneys who fail to comply with the re-fingerprinting rule by April 30, 2019 will be subject to monetary penalties. Attorneys who fail to comply with the re-fingerprinting rule by the final deadline of December 1, 2019 will have their licenses suspended.

For the past 30 years the State Bar has not been complying with its statutory mandate to use attorney fingerprinting to obtain information about attorney arrests and convictions from the California Department of Justice (DOJ).  Although attorneys were fingerprinted at the time of admission to the State Bar, neither the Bar nor the DOJ retained those fingerprints for purposes of reporting arrests and convictions of admitted attorneys.

Rule 9.9.5 rectified this situation by requiring all active licensed attorneys to be re-fingerprinted by December 1, 2019. The State Bar and DOJ will retain the fingerprints to enable the Bar to receive state and federal criminal record information, including a summary of arrests, criminal charges, and sentencing.

Thus far, the re-fingerprinting rule has revealed that over 2,000 practicing attorneys have previously unreported criminal records, including 20 previously unreported felonies. The 20 previously unreported felonies have been sent to the State Bar’s Office of Chief Trial Counsel for review and potential disciplinary action.

Regardless of the re-fingerprinting rule, attorneys are required to report criminal convictions to the State Bar under the self-reporting mandate. The State Bar may discipline attorneys for failing to report a conviction to the Bar, for the conviction itself, or for both.  The best practice is to self-report any convictions as well as timely comply with the re-fingerprinting rules.

Even attorneys who have no criminal history should be sure to submit their fingerprints by the final December 1, 2019 deadline. Otherwise, such attorneys risk license suspension and exposure to liability for the unauthorized practice of law.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Paige Pembrook at [email protected].

Can California Associate Attorneys Be Disciplined For Their Boss’s Misconduct?

Posted on: February 27th, 2019

By: Gregory Fayard

The answer to this question is yes, in certain circumstances. In November 2018, after 29 years, California enacted new rules of professional conduct for lawyers. The new rules have some major changes from the old rules. One of the biggest changes applies to associate attorneys who are just doing what their boss-lawyer tells them. But what if the associate’s boss is instructing the associate to do something obviously unethical? In that case, the associate can be disciplined by the State Bar. The new rule on this point is 5.2. For example, if the associate’s boss advises the associate to lie to a client, or forge a signature, or divulge client secrets, then those breaches are so obvious the associate could be disciplined. All California lawyers must comply with ethics rules, even if acting at the direction of another. The Nuremberg defense does not fly.

What about a close call? What if the associate’s boss tells the associate to do the bare minimum on a case? That order arguably violates a lawyer’s duty of diligence (Rule 1.3). Or, what if the associate’s boss orders an associate to do everything and anything on a file? That order might violate Rule 3.2 which says lawyers shall not do tasks whose substantial purpose is to prolong or cause needless expense. In these two situations, the ethical breach is an arguable question—a “close call” if you will. In these situations the California associate would have a good argument for not being disciplined.

The new California rules of professional conduct, however, have created a potentially awkward employment situation for associates: if the subordinate lawyer believes his or her supervisor’s solution to an ethics issue would violate an ethical rule, “the subordinate is obligated to communicate his or her professional judgment regarding the matter to the supervisory lawyer.”  (See Comment to Rule 5.2.)

What should California lawyers keep in mind, then?

  1. Don’t blindly follow directions from your supervisor without thinking of the ethical implications;
  2. Doing something obviously unethical can get you in trouble with the State Bar even if the direction came from your boss;
  3. You probably will not be disciplined if an ethical question can be answered more than one way;
  4. You may have to have a talk with your boss if he or she is doing something obviously unethical.

My next blog will discuss whether a supervising lawyer in California can be disciplined for an associate’s unethical lapse.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Greg Fayard at [email protected].

New Task Force Aims to Reform California’s Technological Ethical Rules

Posted on: January 15th, 2019

By: Paige Pembrook

On December 5, 2018, the California State Bar Task Force on Access Through Innovation in Legal Services held its first meeting and started a long process to modernize ethical rules that currently inhibit lawyers from fully using innovative technologies and services from non-lawyer businesses. Under the Current Rules of Professional Conduct for California lawyers, attorneys risk professional discipline and malpractice liability when using services and software offered by non-lawyer technology businesses, even though those services and software offer significant potential to improve access to and delivery of legal services.

Earlier this year, the State Bar charged the Task Force with recommending rule modifications to allow collaboration and technological innovation in legal services, including use of artificial intelligence and online legal service delivery models. The Task Force is specifically tasked with scrutinizing existing rules and regulations concerning the unauthorized practice of law, lawyer advertising and solicitation, partnerships with non-lawyers, fee splitting, and referral compensation. The Task Force must submit its recommendations to the State Bar Board of Trustees before December 31, 2019.

As any effective rule changes remain years away, lawyers must be aware of and comply with the current rules that restrict lawyers seeking to collaborate with and use technology from non-lawyer businesses. The Rules of Professional Conduct are often implicated when lawyers collaborate with non-lawyer businesses offering technology-driven legal services and software. These rules include those premised on harm to clients that flows from incompetent legal service (Rule 1.1), non-lawyer ownership of law offices and the unauthorized practice of law (Rules 5.4 and 5.5), and the dissemination of biased and/or misleading information (Rules 7.1-7.3).

To the extent that lawyers violate any of the aforementioned rules by using technology-driven legal services and software offered by non-lawyer businesses, they may be subject to State Bar discipline.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Paige Pembrook at [email protected].

The California State Bar’s New Rule Follows a National Trend of Disciplining Attorneys for Discrimination

Posted on: August 24th, 2018

By: Paige Pembrook

The newly revised California Rules of Professional Conduct for attorneys, set to take effect November 1, 2018, include a tougher approach to discrimination, harassment, and retaliation in legal practice that exposes attorneys to State Bar discipline even where there has been no prior court determination of any wrongful conduct. The new rule is part of a national trend prohibiting discrimination as attorney misconduct.

Current Rule 2-400 that applies through October 2018 prohibits discrimination and harassment in connection with the management or operation of a law practice. Once a court determines that an attorney has committed unlawful discrimination and/or harassment, the State Bar can investigate and impose discipline. Given that no discipline appears to have been imposed under the current rule in the thirty years since its enactment in 1989, the new rule has teeth to allow for greater enforcement.

New Rule 8.4.1 replaces and fundamentally changes the current rule to expand attorneys’ exposure to State Bar discipline for discriminatory conduct. First, Rule 8.4.1 expands the scope of wrongful conduct to explicitly prohibit retaliation as well as discrimination and harassment. Second, Rule 8.4.1 prohibits all such conduct in connection with the representation of a client, the termination or refusal to accept the representation of any client, and law firm operations, whereas the current rule only prohibits conduct in connection with the management or operation of a law practice. Finally, Rule 8.4.1 eliminates the current requirement that there be a prior adjudication by a court that unlawful discrimination occurred before the State Bar can commence an investigation or impose discipline on an attorney for such discrimination.

The elimination of the requirement of a court adjudication of wrongdoing prior to State Bar investigation and discipline is the most drastic and contested change in the rule. Essentially, the State Bar Court becomes a forum of first resort for alleged victims of discriminatory, harassing, or retaliatory conduct by attorneys, despite the State Bar Court having limited resources and due process protections. Concern over the elimination of the prior adjudication requirement led to a new self-reporting requirement for attorneys who receive notice of disciplinary charges for violating Rule 8.4.1. It requires such attorneys to provide the disciplinary charges to the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, the U.S. Department of Justice, or the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, allowing the agencies to become involved and institute parallel administrative or judicial proceedings stemming from the same conduct. Attorneys must also report such parallel proceedings to the State Bar, allowing it to step aside so that the appropriate court or agency can adjudicate the matter.

In sum, the new rule is harsh. The comments to the new rule make clear that it permits the imposition of discipline for conduct that would not necessarily result in an award or remedy in a civil proceeding. Any person (including but not limited to prospective, former, and current employees, clients, and opposing counsel) can file complaints alleging discrimination with the State Bar that trigger investigations and discipline up to and including disbarment. Disciplinary charges may also trigger reporting requirements to government agencies that may lead to further investigations and proceedings.  Discipline for misconduct can also serve as evidence in a legal malpractice claim, demonstrating that an attorney fell below the standard of care. For example, if an attorney’s harassment of a firm employee resulted in that employee missing critical deadlines that impacted the outcome of a client’s matter, State Bar discipline based on that harassment may be evidence in a malpractice action against the attorney.

Although California has had a rule prohibiting discrimination since 1989, the reinforced new Rule 8.4.1 is part of a national trend prohibiting discrimination in the practice of law. In 2016, the ABA approved Model Rule 8.4(g) that makes it professional misconduct to engage in conduct that the lawyer knows or reasonably should know is harassment or discrimination. Twenty states already have provisions in their attorney conduct rules addressing the subject of Model Rule 8.4 in some manner or adopting a version of Model Rule 8.4, including Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Ohio, New Jersey, New York, Michigan, Minnesota, Vermont, and the District of Columbia, to name a few.

California’s new Rule 8.4.1 is one of the strongest prohibitions and goes far beyond the ABA’s Model Rule 8.4 in policing discriminatory misconduct by attorneys. However, other states are likely to follow the ABA and California’s lead in increasing the State Bar’s powers to discipline attorneys for discrimination, retaliation, and harassment. Accordingly, all attorneys should be wary that conduct that was previously considered a professional discourtesy may be actionable misconduct that will lead to discipline, and any resulting discipline may provide evidence of attorney malpractice.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Paige Pembrook at [email protected].