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Posts Tagged ‘subcontractor’

Amendments To Pennsylvania’s CASPA Will Change The Landscape Of Payment Disputes

Posted on: August 3rd, 2018

By: Jonathan Romvary

Anyone who has ever done any amount of work as a contractor or who has represented them in collections cases has learned from hard experience that it can be all but impossible to get paid for one’s work. In Pennsylvania, the Contractor and Subcontractor Act (CASPA) was introduced in 1994 as a complement to the Pennsylvania Mechanic’s Lien Law and was intended to provide contractors (and subcontractors) with additional remedies against those owners/contractors withholding payment for their services. However, the landscape of these payment disputes is likely to significantly change as a result of recent legislation.

Last year, a Pennsylvania state representative introduced a bill, which sought to substantially amend the act and for the first time since 1994, provide further protections for contractors against those withholding funds for the work. That bill has languished in the House Commerce Committee since last year. Nonetheless, a similar bill amending CASPA was referred to the state senate and in June 2018, Governor Tom Wolf signed the bill into law as Act 27. Amongst the numerous amendments to CASPA, Act 27 now provides:

  • If an owner fails to adhere to the terms or withholds payment, contractors and subcontractors may stop performance of the work (subject to contractual limits);
  • There is no permissible waiver of any provision of CASPA;
  • Failure to provide the contractor with a 14 day written notice of a deficiency results in a waiver of the right to withhold payment for the deficiency and requires full payment of the invoice;
  • If a party alleges an invoice contains an error, that party must pay the correct amount on the date payment would otherwise be due otherwise it will be an improper withholding; and,
  • Withholding retention for longer than 30 days after final acceptance of the work generally qualifies as improper withholding.

These new changes are scheduled to take effect on October 10.

Without question, these changes increase the negotiation power of contractors and subcontractors, however, more importantly, the changes reinforce the need for owners and contractors to maintain clear payment records as only clear payment records will provide owners and contractors a sufficient defense in any payment dispute. Owners, contractors and subcontractors involved in payment disputes need to be aware of their respective obligations and rights.

Anyone in the construction industry that has questions about these amendments and how they may affect their business or current projects, please contact Jonathan Romvary at [email protected].

Pay-When-Paid Clauses: A Cautionary Tale

Posted on: March 28th, 2018

By: Jake Carroll

With the recent surge of construction projects in Georgia, the memories of owner and developer bankruptcies following the 2008 financial crisis may have grown dim. Nevertheless, material suppliers and subcontractors must remember that when the pace slows down, their contracts could leave them without remedy or recourse to seek payment.

One of the most common issues in construction disputes is whether a general contractor is obligated to pay its subcontractor before the general contractor has received payment from the owner for the work. Most construction subcontracts address this problem and attempt to make the owner’s payment to the general contractor a condition precedent to the general contractor’s obligation to pay the subcontractor. Typically, these clauses are known as “pay when paid” clauses because they condition the general contractor’s obligation to pay the subcontractor upon receipt of payment by the owner.

Georgia appears to adhere to the rule that if the contract makes payments from the owner a condition precedent to the general contractor’s obligation to pay, then the general contractor’s obligation never arises if the owner becomes insolvent and never makes a payment. See Vratsinas Constr. Co. v. Triad Drywall, LLC, 739 S.E.2d 493 (Ga. Ct. App. 2013). Thus, if an owner fails to pay a general contractor due to the owner’s bankruptcy, the subcontractor also remains unpaid. What’s more, the provisions of the automatic stay in Bankruptcy cases may prevent the subcontractor from claiming or enforcing its rights under Georgia’s mechanic lien statutes—depending on the specific circumstances of the Project. See 11 U.S.C. 362. When combined, these circumstances leave the unpaid subcontractor with limited legal remedies and could lead the subcontractor to consider its own option for relief under the Bankruptcy code.

In order to avoid these potential payment issues, all parties in the construction process should carefully review their contracts for “pay when paid” clauses during the contract negotiation and drafting phase of the Project. And despite subcontractors’ limited bargaining power in modifying the terms of its subcontract, full awareness of the contract terms should allow the subcontractor to mitigate risk on its Projects. For advice on specific language or for questions regarding general construction contract terms and conditions, contact Jake Carroll at [email protected] or any member of the FMG Construction Practice Group.

 

Minnesota High Court Rules that Additional Insured is not Covered in the Absence of Negligence of the Named Insured

Posted on: March 28th, 2013

By: Bart Gary

Many contracts, especially construction contracts, will contain a provision whereby one party, usually a subcontractor, agrees to add the other party to the contract, usually the general contractor, as an additional insured on the former’s insurance coverage. Where the additional insured has its own coverage, the question arises as to whether there are in effect multiple insurance coverages for the additional insured, and whether the named insured’s insurance policy must answer for claims against the additional insured.

The Supreme Court of Minnesota was confronted with a very unusual set of facts. A general contractor was an additional insured in the liability policy of its subcontractor. The general contractor directed the subcontractor where to install sheet piles; however, the subcontractor actually drove the piles and thereby damaged underground pipes. A jury had determined that the subcontractor was not negligent in damaging the pipes.  The general contractor nevertheless contended that it was covered under the subcontractor’s liability insurance policy as an additional insured.

The Court held that the additional insured endorsement in the subcontractor’s insurance policy is plainly for vicarious or derivative liability of the additional insured based upon the negligence of the principal, or named, insured. Vicarious liability arises where one party, for example an employer, is liable for the conduct of an employee by the relationship. Since the general contractor could be vicariously liable only if the subcontractor was liable, the jury’s exoneration of the subcontractor meant that the general contractor was not covered as an additional insured on the subcontractor’s policy. Eng’g. & Constr. Innovations, Inc. v. L.H. Bolduc Co., 825 N.W.2d 695 (Minn. 2013).