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Posts Tagged ‘summary judgment’

A Series of Particular Events: Foreseeability and the First Circuit

Posted on: February 6th, 2019

By: Thomas Hay

A three-judge panel on the First Circuit denied Omni Hotel’s petition for review of their decision to overturn a lower court ruling that awarded summary judgment to Omni and reinstated a negligence charge filed by a man who was beaten, and his arm broken by a group of individuals in Omni Hotel’s Providence, Rhode Island hotel lobby. The First Circuit held that the development of a particular sequence of events can, without more, render future harm foreseeable.

The First Circuit’s opinion effectively broadened the duty of care imposed on hotels to protect guests and members of the public against spontaneous criminal conduct by a third party.

The plaintiff lived in a condominium complex adjoining the hotel. He had access to and regularly used the hotel’s services and amenities. On the night in question, hotel security had evicted from the premises a group of youths whose partying had caused a disturbance. Some of the evicted group returned outside the hotel with a case of beer and attempted to pick a fight with a passer-by which was seen by the hotel’s valet. A number of the group would later reenter the hotel’s lobby and proceed to beat the plaintiff resulting in the breaking of his arm.

While the lower court found that Omni had a special relationship to the plaintiff, as the “possessor of land that holds the land open to the public/member of the public,” on the issue of foreseeability, the lower court found that the hotel did not have a legal duty to protect the plaintiff from an attack spontaneously committed by third parties. Additionally, the lower court found it unforeseeable that the specific rowdy and later evicted group would spontaneously attack the plaintiff.

In the First Circuit’s review of the case, Omni cited Rhode Island cases that pertained to a “past occurrences” theory of foreseeability, whereas the plaintiff cited cases that illustrated a “sequence of events” theory of foreseeability. The First Circuit ultimately agreed with the plaintiff, saying that while it may not have been foreseeable that the group would assault the plaintiff at the time of their eviction, the attack was foreseeable by the time the group had returned and tried to pick a fight with the passer-by.

The First Circuit stated that the development of a particular sequence of events can, without more, render future harm foreseeable. According to Omni, this decision imposes an undue burden on businesses, “which will now unnecessarily face the prospect of a jury trial every time anyone is injured on their premises.”

While the implications of this case as it pertains to the liability of business owners and injuries that occur on their premises goes to be seen, hotels in the First Circuit should be wary of omitting to assist any guest or even member of the public from the actions of aggressive third parties.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Thomas Hay at [email protected].

 

Mu v. Omni Hotels Management Corp., 885 F.3d 52 (1st Cir. 2018)
Mu v. Omni Hotels Management Corp., 882 F.3d 1 (1st Cir. 2018)

A Holly(cal) Jolly (Almost) Christmas

Posted on: December 28th, 2018

By: Zach Moura

In what is sure to be the beginning of a slew of cases litigating coverage for injuries caused by drones, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California recently issued an opinion denying coverage under an aircraft exclusion in the drone operator’s Commercial General Liability (CGL) policy. Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company v. Hollycal Production, Inc., et al., 5:18-cv-00768.

The accident at issue occurred when Hollycal Production (“Hollycal”) used a drone to photograph an event. The drone collided with one of the attendees, Darshan Kamboj, blinding her in one eye. Ms. Kamboj subsequently filed suit against Hollycal, its owner, and the Hollycal employee that operated the drone. Hollycal tendered the defense of the suit to Philadelphia Indemnity Insurance Company (“Philadelphia”) under the CGL policy on which Hollycal was an additional insured. Philadelphia agreed to defend Hollycal under a reservation of rights, and then filed a declaratory judgment action seeking a determination that it had no duty to defend or indemnify Hollycal for the Kamboj suit.

Philadelphia moved for summary judgment, in part on the basis that the Aircraft exclusion in the Policy excluded coverage in pertinent part for bodily injury or property damage “arising out of the ownership, maintenance, use or entrustment to others of any aircraft, ‘auto’ or watercraft owned or operated by or rented or loaned to any insured.” Because “aircraft” was not a defined term in the policy, the Court looked to the Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary definition of the word, along with the definition included in 49 U.S.C. § 40102(a)(6) and 14 C.F.R. § 1.1. The Court concluded that a “drone … is an aircraft under the term’s ordinary and plain definition.” Accordingly, the Court found that the Kamboj suit was excluded from coverage and Philadelphia had no duty to defend or indemnify Hollycal.

Drone operators will need to carefully review their insurance and ensure that they have appropriate coverage in place for their drone operations. As this matter makes clear, and as reinforced by recent reports of a drone striking the nose of an Aeromexico plane, an October near-miss of a drone by a passenger plane near London Heathrow, and the shutdown of London Gatwick airport last week because of suspected drone activity, there is substantial exposure arising from drone operations. Without the right insurance, operators may be left disastrously exposed.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Zach Moura at [email protected].

Who’s Liable for Letting the Dogs Out?

Posted on: October 23rd, 2018

By: Wes Jackson

“Cry ‘Havoc!,’ and let slip the dogs of war.”

William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar act 3, sc. 1.

 

Havoc indeed—in a case argued before the Georgia Supreme Court on October 10, two pit bulls slipped out of a tenant’s backyard gate with a broken latch and then mauled a woman walking her smaller dogs nearly two blocks away from the home. Police had to fatally shoot both dogs to end the attack, and the woman was life-flighted to a hospital where she stayed for seven days and was left disfigured after multiple surgeries.

The question before the Court was whether the landlord could be liable for the attack. The trial court entered summary judgment in the landlord’s favor because the plaintiff could not show the landlord had any prior knowledge of the dogs’ propensity for violence. The Georgia Court of Appeals reversed, holding that the question of the landlord’s liability should have been submitted to a jury.

The case exemplifies how thorny questions of proximate causation can jeopardize a defendant’s hopes at summary judgment. For example, the Court of Appeals found the trial court erred by failing to properly consider the fact that the landlord had known the gate latch was broken but failed to repair it. Additionally, the parties argued before the Court whether a landowner’s failure to keep the premises in repair could, as a matter of law, proximately cause an injury that happens more than two blocks away from the property. Given these arguments, the Supreme Court’s decision will likely either extend or limit the scope of landlords’ liability for injuries caused by their tenants or those that occur off the property.

The case is Tyner v. Matta-Troncoso et al., S18G0364. If you have any questions about this case or its impact on landlord liability, premises liability, or dog attack cases in Georgia, feel free to contact Wes Jackson at [email protected].