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Posts Tagged ‘Citizenship’

USCIS Reverses Course – STEM OPT Students May Now Work At 3rd Party Client Sites

Posted on: September 18th, 2018

By: Ken Levine

On August 17th U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) posted an announcement on their website to publicize the agency’s decision to once again allow STEM OPT F-1 students to engage in training programs at a third-party client worksite.  This update supersedes the Agency’s policy change in April 2018 which disallowed STEM OPT students from being placed at 3rd party client sites.

This new guidance essentially restored an employer’s ability to place OPT students in a science, technology, mathematics or engineering (STEM) field at a 3rd party client site, so long as all applicable training obligations are met, and a bona fide employer/employee relationship is maintained for the full duration of the assignment.

This USCIS policy reversal was welcome news for the many U.S. employers who had historically trained their OPT personnel by placing them at 3rd party work sites.  However, it is extremely important that employers be vigilant in ensuring that the training is in full compliance with the I-983 training program. Companies that sponsor their OPT employees for an H-1B visa should expect that USCIS will closely scrutinize the OPT training program details.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Ken Levine of the law firm of Freeman, Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

USCIS Creates Another Roadblock for Legal Immigrants

Posted on: August 8th, 2018

By: Kenneth Levine

A proposed Trump administration change to the “public charge” regulations, expected to be issued within the next few months, will dramatically alter the process for how Immigration Officers determine eligibility for citizenship or permanent residency.  USCIS designates an applicant as a “public charge” if they are likely to become predominantly dependent on government benefits for long term survival.  Currently, USCIS Officers focus on the petitioning sponsor’s income (or a cosponsor’s income if the petitioner’s income falls below the required amount) in assessing eligibility.  Section 212(a)(4) of the Immigration and Nationality Act currently allows USCIS to deem a permanent residency applicant ineligible if they are likely at any time to become a “public charge.” Although the current regulation appears to afford an Immigration Officer considerable discretion in assessing an Applicant’s public charge prospects, in practice there is virtually no discretion.  In other words, if the petitioner or the co-sponsor’s current income satisfies the affidavit of support, then USCIS will typically have no justifiable basis to deny an application on public charge grounds.

The new regulations would substantially redefine “public charge” criteria by creating new grounds of ineligibility if the foreign national (or immediate family members) ever obtained health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or signed up for supplemental assistance programs for financial and/or nutritional assistance for their U.S. citizen children.  Moving forward, USCIS Officers will be allowed to analyze a foreign national applicant’s income, employment history, job skills, health status, assets, and any family history of having received public health benefits (no matter if they were legally entitled to receive such benefits).  This new approach will dramatically expand USCIS authority to deny a case based on the arbitrary whims of an Officer who looks unfavorably on an applicant’s job history or the amount of money they have saved in the bank.

At this point it is unknown whether there will be different public charge standards for permanent residency or citizenship applicants.  Regardless, FMG Immigration Attorneys fully expect that federal litigation will ensue once USCIS attempts to implement the new public charge regulations.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Kenneth Levine of the law firm of Freeman, Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

H-1B Visa Lottery: More Than One Ticket to the Jackpot?

Posted on: April 5th, 2018

By: Layli Eskandari Deal

The answer is No.  U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) has adopted a ruling made by the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) to prohibit multiple H-1B visa request by related entities on behalf of the same beneficiary for the same fiscal year.

Under the H-1B visa cap, employers are only allowed to submit one visa petition on behalf of a beneficiary.  Multiple filings are prohibited. The underlying case arose from USCIS revoking an approved visa petition reasoning that that the employer and a “related entity” had filed for the same beneficiary under the visa cap.

Matter of S-, Inc. (AAO March 23, 2018) clarifies that that the term “related entities” includes “employers, whether or not related through corporate ownership and control, that file cap-subject H-1B visa petitions for the same beneficiary for substantially the same job.  Absent a legitimate business need to file multiple cap-subject petitions for the same beneficiary, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services will deny or revoke the approval of all H-1B cap-subject petitions filed by related entities for that beneficiary.”

In making its decision, the Administrative Appeals Office points to regulation and ultimately fairness in the visa number allocation process.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Layli Eskandari Deal of the law firm of Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

Scam Alert: USCIS Does Not Request Forms I-9 Via Email

Posted on: November 7th, 2017

By: Layli Eskandari Deal

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services has issued the following notice:

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has learned that employers have received scam emails requesting Form I-9 information that appear to come from USCIS. Employers are not required to submit Forms I-9 to USCIS.

Employers must have a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, for every person on their payroll who is required to complete Form I-9. All of these forms must be retained for a certain period of time. Visit I-9 Central to learn more about retention, storage and inspections for Form I-9.

These scam emails come from a fraudulent email address: [email protected]. This is not a USCIS email address. The body of the email may contain USCIS and Office of the Inspector General labels, your address and a fraudulent download button that links to a non-government web address (uscis-online.org). Do not respond to these emails or click the links in them.

If you believe that you received a scam email requesting Form I-9 information from USCIS, report it to the Federal Trade Commission. If you are not sure if it is a scam, forward the suspicious email to the USCIS webmaster. USCIS will review the emails received and share with law enforcement agencies as appropriate. Visit the Avoid Scams Initiative for more information on common scams and other important tips.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Layli Eskandari Deal of the law firm of Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].