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Posts Tagged ‘immigration’

Latest Update on the H-1B Visa Application Process

Posted on: February 11th, 2019

By: Layli Eskandari Deal

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has issued a final rule implementing changes to the H-1B visa program for petitions filed under the H-1B cap (better known as the H-1B visa lottery).

The rule reverses the order whereby USCIS selects H-1B petitions for the standard allotment of 65,000 visas and the 20,000 visas allocated for the advanced-degree exemption. It also adds an electronic registration requirement for petitioners seeking to file H-1B cap-subject petitions. The final rule is scheduled to become effective on April 1, 2019.

Under the reverse selection process, USCIS will first select H-1B petitions for the general allotment of 65,000 visas. Then USCIS will select from the remaining petitions a number estimated to reach the advanced degree exemption. The reverse selection rule applies to petitions filed for the FY 2020 H-1B cap season (this year). The agency expects the lottery reversal to increase the number of individuals selected who possess an advanced degree from a U.S. institution.

The rule also implements an electronic registration requirement for H-1B cap-subject petitions which DHS has postponed until next cap season (FY 2021). Once implemented, it will require those seeking to file H-1B cap petitions to first electronically register with USCIS. Only petitioners whose registrations are selected will then be able to file an H-1B cap-subject petition.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Layli Eskandari Deal of the law firm of Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP at 770.551.2700 or [email protected].

USCIS Reverses Course – STEM OPT Students May Now Work At 3rd Party Client Sites

Posted on: September 18th, 2018

By: Ken Levine

On August 17th U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) posted an announcement on their website to publicize the agency’s decision to once again allow STEM OPT F-1 students to engage in training programs at a third-party client worksite.  This update supersedes the Agency’s policy change in April 2018 which disallowed STEM OPT students from being placed at 3rd party client sites.

This new guidance essentially restored an employer’s ability to place OPT students in a science, technology, mathematics or engineering (STEM) field at a 3rd party client site, so long as all applicable training obligations are met, and a bona fide employer/employee relationship is maintained for the full duration of the assignment.

This USCIS policy reversal was welcome news for the many U.S. employers who had historically trained their OPT personnel by placing them at 3rd party work sites.  However, it is extremely important that employers be vigilant in ensuring that the training is in full compliance with the I-983 training program. Companies that sponsor their OPT employees for an H-1B visa should expect that USCIS will closely scrutinize the OPT training program details.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Ken Levine of the law firm of Freeman, Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

Supreme Court on Prolonged Detention and Bond for Immigrants

Posted on: March 27th, 2018

By: Layli Eskandari Deal

Immigration has been a hot topic in the news lately due to the various issues being litigated in the Courts.  Recently the Supreme Court made a ruling on the issue of prolonged detention by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) of immigrants who are in removal (deportation) proceedings.

In Jennings v. Rodriguez, 138 S.Ct. 830 (2018), the Supreme Court held that the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) authorizes the prolonged detention of certain noncitizens without a custody hearing during their removal cases.  This was a reversal of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision that authorized detention only for six months, at which point, the detained individual must then receive a custody (bond) hearing before an Immigration Judge.  Post decision, the Supreme Court has remanded this case back to the Ninth Circuit for consideration of whether the 5th Amendment Due Process Clause entitles immigrants to a hearing over their prolonged detention.

This week the Supreme Court has agreed to review whether U.S. immigration laws allow ICE to indefinitely detain foreign nationals in the removal process if the person has previously committed crimes.  The case is Nielsen v. Preap.  Current laws allow ICE to take an individual into custody after they have served their criminal jail term prior to their release from prison.  A person detained immediately can then be held indefinitely.  The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that foreign nationals who are not promptly taken into custody must be given an opportunity to be released on bond.  The federal government argues the same rules should apply to individuals promptly taken into custody as those who are released from prison and then taken into custody at a later date.  We now await the Supreme Court’s decision on this type of detention.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Layli Eskandari Deal of the law firm of Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

Planning To File Your 2018 H-1B Cap Case Under Premium Processing? Not So Fast…

Posted on: March 27th, 2018

By: Kenneth S. Levine

On March 20th USCIS announced an indefinite suspension of the premium processing program for H-1B visa petitions that are subject to the 2018 statutory cap.  The annual statutory cap limits the total of H-1B visas that can be approved in any one year to 85,000, 20,000 of which are set aside for foreign nationals who obtained a Master’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university in the U.S.

H-1B cap exempt petitions, which applies to higher education institutions, non-profits affiliated with a higher education institution and non-profit or governmental research organizations, remain eligible for premium processing.

The USCIS announcement made clear that any H-1B petitions that include a request for premium processing would simply be rejected and returned to the employer. The suspension of the premium processing service does not apply to petitions for renewals, amendments or transfers of H-1B visas.

It should be noted that USCIS also suspended premium processing in March 2017 for H-1B cap and cap exempt cases.  The program was reinstated around 6 months later.  Therefore, FMG Immigration Attorneys are cautiously optimistic that premium processing for soon to be filed H-1B cap cases will resume in October 2018.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Kenneth S. Levine of the law firm of Freeman, Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected].

Latest Developments In DACA

Posted on: February 19th, 2018

By: Kenneth S. Levine

On 2/15/2018 four (4) separate legislative bills that sought to address the March 5th termination of the DACA program, border security, family-based immigration and the Diversity Lottery were put up for a vote in the U.S. Senate.  None of the bills garnered the necessary 60 votes to overcome a filibuster threshold and move the legislation to the House of Representatives.  At this point it seems doubtful that any piece of legislation will pass Congress that addresses DACA recipients, a border wall, the elimination of family-based categories and the Diversity visa lottery.

As to the March 5th date on which the DACA program was set to terminate, within the last several weeks two Federal Judges in the U.S. District Court in California and New York issued nationwide injunctions that, for now, keeps the DACA program intact beyond the March 5th deadline.  While the injunctions mean that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security must continue processing DACA renewal applications, the Judges are not requiring the Department to accept DACA applications from first time Applicants.

The latest major development on this issue is that the U.S. Supreme Court met on 2/16/18 to determine whether to accept a request from the U.S. Justice Department to take up the injunction cases. We expect their decision within the next few days.  An affirmative decision means that the Court would essentially leapfrog the relevant U.S. Court of Appeals in determining whether the injunctions are legally valid.  If the Supreme Court declines to accept immediate jurisdiction of the Justice Department’s appeals, then it will likely take 9-12 months for the 2nd and 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to render a decision.  Whatever the result, constitutional law legal experts widely anticipate that the U.S. Supreme Court will ultimately decide this issue.

The Immigration Attorneys of Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP strongly advise all current DACA recipients to consider filing renewal applications immediately.  Although we do expect the DACA program to ultimately be terminated, those with pending renewal applications will likely be in a strong legal position to have their cases adjudicated.

For additional information related to this topic and for advice regarding how to navigate U.S. immigration laws you may contact Kenneth S. Levine of the law firm of Freeman, Mathis & Gary, LLP at (770-551-2700) or [email protected]