CLOSE X
RSS Feed LinkedIn Instagram Twitter Facebook
Search:
FMG Law Blog Line

Archive for the ‘Coronavirus – Employment Law Blog’ Category

PPP is Back with Second Draws and Favorable Tax Treatment

Posted on: December 22nd, 2020

By: Justin Boron

The Paycheck Protection Program is set to return in 2021. 

As part of the $900 billion COVID-19 relief bill passed yesterday, Congress renewed the popular small business relief program administered by the Small Business Administration to allow certain qualifying businesses to take out a second draw on their forgivable loan, re-opened PPP to first-time borrowers that qualify, and set tax law to allow businesses to take advantage of tax deductions associated with PPP-funded expenses.

To qualify for a second draw loan, the business must have 300 or fewer employees, exhaust their current loan proceeds before the second loan is issued, and show a 25 percent decline in gross receipts in any 2020 quarter compared to the same quarter in 2019.  These are new requirements that apply only to second loans.

The loan comes with some of the same conditions as the PPP loans issued in the first two rounds of funding in 2020—such as requirement that 60 percent of the funds be spent on payroll.  But it also eliminated a disfavored IRS ruling that effectively diminished the value of forgiveness by prohibiting deductions for expenses using PPP funds.  The new provision expressly states that the forgiveness amount will not be treated as income and the expenses may be deducted.

Additionally, the new law expands the list of forgivable expenses to include certain personal protective equipment needed to comply with federal COVID-19 guidelines, certain operations expenses such as HR and payroll accounting software, and certain property damage costs caused by public disturbances in 2020.

The amount of the loan will remain the same—2.5 times the business’s average monthly payroll costs in the year prior to the loan or the calendar year—unless the business has a NAICS code beginning with 72, such as restaurant and hospitality businesses.  Congress upped their loan amount to 3.5 times the monthly payroll cost calculation.  But it lowered the cap on all loans to $2 million.

The new law also opened forgivable loans up to 501(c)(6) organizations, such as chambers of commerce or certain industry associations as long as they don’t exceed certain lobbying activities.

It will take some time for the SBA to be set up for new loan applications.  But the law requires it to issue regulations within 10 days after the legislation is signed into law.

FMG’s Coronavirus Task Force is reviewing the entire stimulus bill passed by Congress to advise clients on the benefits and obligations it creates. Please check back for additional posts on this topic.

If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Justin Boron at [email protected].

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients. Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments. For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER: The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19. The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement. We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG. An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you. We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such. We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

CDC Issues Relaxed Alternatives to Previous Quarantine Guidelines

Posted on: December 2nd, 2020

By: Margot Parker

Today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced new quarantine guidelines for people exposed to Covid-19, reducing the previous two-week quarantine time to seven to ten days in asymptomatic cases.

While a 14-day quarantine is still “the best way to reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19,” the CDC said it is approving “two acceptable alternatives.” First, if a person has not developed any symptoms, their quarantine can end ten days after being exposed to the virus. Further, if the asymptomatic person tests negative for the coronavirus, quarantine can end even sooner at seven days. The CDC notes the sample for the negative test result should be collected within 48 hours of the final quarantine day. 

The CDC’s quarantine recommendations apply to those deemed “close contacts” of Covid-19 patients, defined as someone “who was within 6 feet of an infected person for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period starting from 2 days before illness onset” or who received a positive test result.

The new guidelines are based on CDC models showing a minimal one to five percent risk of spreading the virus to others using seven to ten-day quarantine periods in asymptomatic people. Public health officials believe the shortened alternatives may promote greater compliance among the public while reducing the economic and public health burden caused by a longer quarantine. 

Notably, local health officials can adjust the CDC’s recommendations to fit the situations of their jurisdictions, and the CDC encourages people to monitor their own symptoms for a full 14 days after exposure, regardless of the length of quarantine. 

If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Margot Parker at [email protected].

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Announce New “Safer at Home” Restrictions

Posted on: November 18th, 2020

By: Justin Boron

The City of Philadelphia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania announced new measures this week aimed at curbing the spike in COVID cases in the region, but neither appear to be ready to initiate a broad-based shutdown like the one that began in March earlier this year.

Set to take effect Friday, the City of Philadelphia’s “Safer at Home” restrictions will have the most immediate effect on businesses and employers. Under them, the following business activities are prohibited:

  • High schools and colleges must move to online instruction only, with the exception of clinical instruction for students in health sciences. 
  • Indoor dining at restaurants and other food service businesses.
  • Theaters, including movie theaters, and other performance spaces. 
  • Bowling alleys, arcades and game spaces.
  • Museums.
  • Libraries.
  • Casinos.
  • Recreational activities and sports for youth, community groups, and schools. 
  • Gyms and indoor exercise classes. (Exercise groups and classes may continue outdoors.)
  • Senior day services (senior centers and adult day care centers) remain closed.

Additionally, the Philadelphia mayor’s order modifies restrictions on restaurants, retail, and office businesses:

  • Restaurants offering outdoor dining must reduce table sizes to four people and limited to members of the same household
  • Retail stores and indoor malls have a max density of 5 people per 1,000 square feet.
  • Offices are permitted to have only employees that cannot work remotely.

The Commonwealth is taking a more targeted approach, but has mandated mask-wearing both inside and outside. Additionally, travelers in and out of Pennsylvania are encouraged to obtain a negative COVID test or quarantine for 14 days. But Pennsylvania officials acknowledged that they do not plan to actively enforce the guideline.

If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Justin Boron at [email protected].

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

Statute of Limitations Tolled in California Amid Pandemic

Posted on: August 3rd, 2020

By: Matthew Jones

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, California’s Governor Gavin Newsom issued a “state of emergency” for the entire State. In response, the California Judicial Council adopted several Emergency Rules to implement during the pandemic. In particular, Rule 9 states that all statute of limitations for civil causes of action are tolled from April 6, 2020 until 90 days after the state of emergency related to COVID-19 is lifted by the Governor. Therefore, if a party’s claim would have expired pursuant to the applicable statute of limitations during this timeframe, such claims are still very much alive. In regard to those claims, there is currently no deadline to file them since the “state of emergency” has yet to be lifted by the Governor. Once lifted, claimants will have six months to file their respective claims.

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**

Pennsylvania Offers Certain Employers Help with Hazard Pay

Posted on: July 23rd, 2020

By: Justin Boron

Last week, the governor made $50 million available to businesses, health care non-profits, public transit agencies, and certain economic development organizations to cover hazard pay for ‘front line’ employees exposed in life-sustaining industries exposed to COVID-19 risks. The payments must go toward paying employees in certain industries, including healthcare, food manufacturing, food retail, childcare, janitorial, transit, and security services.

The hazard pay is a $3/hour raise on the employee’s regular pay rate paid during the ten-week period from August 16, 2020 to October 24, 2020. It also must be used to supplement—rather than supplant—any eligible overtime, benefits, existing employer-paid, hazard pay, or any scheduled increases to current compensation. The funding also may be used only to pay direct, full-time and part-time employees earning less than $20/hour, excluding fringe benefits and overtime.

Eligible businesses must apply online with the Department of Community and Economic Development.  The amount of funding is limited to $1,200 per full-time equivalent employee for up to 500 employees per location.

Employers relying on this program will need to be careful to assimilate the hazard pay correctly into their pay system to ensure compliance with wage-and-hour regulations. One question left unanswered is whether the adjusted regular rate that includes hazard pay should be used for calculating the overtime rate. It’s likely that additional guidance will be issued, so employers using a hazard pay grant will need to track updates.

If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Justin Boron at [email protected].

Additional Information:

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients.  Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments.  For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER:  The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19.  The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement.  We can only give legal advice to clients.  Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG.  An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest.  As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such.  We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.**