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Posts Tagged ‘#Atlanta’

UPDATE: City of Atlanta’s COVID-19 Shut-Down Order Revised to Allow All Construction to Proceed

Posted on: March 25th, 2020

By: Jake Carroll

The Associated General Contractors of Georgia, Inc. reports that a corrected executive order has been issued by The Office of Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms designating all construction as “Essential Infrastructure.” The original executive order limited “Essential Infrastructure” to public works construction projects . The revision allows all construction projects to move forward within the jurisdictional limits of the City of Atlanta.

 Additional information: 

The FMG Coronavirus Task Team will be conducting a series of webinars on Coronavirus issues every day for the next week. We will discuss the impact of Coronavirus for companies in general, but also for business in insurance, healthcare, California specific issues, cybersecurity, and tort. Click here to register.

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients. Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the Coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments. For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER: The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19. The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement. We can only give legal advice to clients. Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG. An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest. As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such. We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.** 

 

City of Atlanta’s COVID-19 Shut-Down Order Impacts Certain Construction Projects

Posted on: March 24th, 2020

By: Jake Carroll

Executive Order Number 2020-21 (“Shut-Down Order”) was issued by Kiesha Lance Bottoms, the Mayor of Atlanta, on March 23, 2020 at 8:49PM. Atlanta’s Shut-Down Order is more restrictive than similar orders seen in Florida (with broader exceptions for construction) and  California (allowed some construction to proceed).

Key Terms:

  • Jurisdiction: Order only applies to projects within the jurisdictional limits of Atlanta.
  • Date and Time of Effect: March 24, 2020 at Midnight.

Impact on Construction Projects: shutters construction projects that are not deemed “Essential Infrastructure” or “Essential Business” as defined by or enumerated in the Order.

  • Essential Infrastructure” is limited to projects for public works construction, airport operations, public transportation, utilities, and telecommunications, etc.  It generally does not capture more commercial construction, like warehousing or housing.
  • Essential Businesses” provides additional categories related to construction, including:
    • Healthcare operations and infrastructure;
    • Businesses that provide shelter for economically disadvantaged individuals (affordable housing projects may qualify);
    • Educational facilities; and
    • Residential facilities and shelters for seniors, adults or children.
  • General commercial construction projects like hotels, apartments and warehouses likely do not qualify.

Further Considerations:

  • Construction Industry Stakeholders should review FMG’s COVID-19: Commons Issues in Construction Contracts
  • Contractors should evaluate all existing construction contracts within the City’s jurisdiction, to determine what their rights and obligations are, including notice requirements.
  • Developers should evaluate whether they have any recourse under existing insurance policies, including business interruption and builder’s risk. Typically these policies are not implicated absent direct physical damage to property, but the results depend on the specifics of each policy.

Additional information: 

The FMG Coronavirus Task Team will be conducting a series of webinars on Coronavirus issues every day for the next week. We will discuss the impact of Coronavirus for companies in general, but also for business in insurance, healthcare, California specific issues, cybersecurity, and tort. Click here to register.

FMG has formed a Coronavirus Task Force to provide up-to-the-minute information, strategic advice, and practical solutions for our clients. Our group is an interdisciplinary team of attorneys who can address the multitude of legal issues arising out of the Coronavirus pandemic, including issues related to Healthcare, Product Liability, Tort Liability, Data Privacy, and Cyber and Local Governments. For more information about the Task Force, click here.

You can also contact your FMG relationship partner or email the team with any questions at [email protected].

**DISCLAIMER: The attorneys at Freeman Mathis & Gary, LLP (“FMG”) have been working hard to produce educational content to address issues arising from the concern over COVID-19. The webinars and our written material have produced many questions. Some we have been able to answer, but many we cannot without a specific legal engagement. We can only give legal advice to clients. Please be aware that your attendance at one of our webinars or receipt of our written material does not establish an attorney-client relationship between you and FMG. An attorney-client relationship will not exist unless and until an FMG partner expressly and explicitly states IN WRITING that FMG will undertake an attorney-client relationship with you, after ascertaining that the firm does not have any legal conflicts of interest. As a result, you should not transmit any personal or confidential information to FMG unless we have entered into a formal written agreement with you.  We will continue to produce education content for the public, but we must point out that none of our webinars, articles, blog posts, or other similar material constitutes legal advice, does not create an attorney client relationship and you cannot rely on it as such. We hope you will continue to take advantage of the conferences and materials that may pertain to your work or interests.** 

To Pursue or Not to Pursue

Posted on: January 10th, 2020

By: Sara Brochstein

The City of Atlanta Police Department has announced that its officers will no longer engage in vehicular pursuits while it takes time to review its pursuit policies. This decision comes in the face of recent deadly crashes where suspects in stolen vehicles struck and killed motorists while fleeing police pursuits.

Police pursuits have often been the subject of controversy as the risks and benefits are constantly being weighed.  On one hand, pursuits have the potential to put innocent pedestrians and motorists in harm’s way.  In situations where the crime or violation is minor, the risk is even more unjustified.  Conversely, to disengage in pursuits altogether signals to people that arrest can be avoided by evading the police in vehicles.  This certainly has the potential lead to an increase in crime as Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields acknowledged when announcing the City’s change in position.

Notably, the City’s new policy is intended to only serve as an interim policy while the department “work[s] to identify specific personnel and certain specialized pursuit training to enable the department to conduct pursuits in limited instances.”  However, as long as the no-pursuit policy remains in effect, the City of Atlanta may prove to be an instructive case study as to whether pursuits are worth the risk.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Sara Brochstein at [email protected].

City Hacks – Atlanta’s 2018 Cyberattack and the Growing Need for Cyber Liability Insurance

Posted on: February 12th, 2019

By: Matthew Weiss

Already a growing area of liability insurance for businesses, the importance of cyber insurance for local governments came to the forefront last March when the City of Atlanta suffered a malware attack in which its computer networks were hijacked by hackers seeking a ransom equal to $51,000 in bitcoin. The cyberattack left the City unable to perform basic services, including processing tickets in municipal court and providing Wi-Fi service at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. At one point, city employees were advised not to even turn on their computers.

While Atlanta’s cyberattack made national headlines, the role that cyber insurance played in its response has been largely undocumented. The City holds a cyber insurance policy with AIG, and the total cost associated with the cyberattack is believed to have approached $5 million.

Although Atlanta redacted key details of its cyber insurance policy, including its coverage limits, in response to press inquiries, the State of Georgia has acknowledged that it holds a $100 million cyber insurance policy, the largest of any state, covering more than 100 state agencies including every branch of state government except higher education. The policy was put to use when the Georgia Department of Agriculture’s computer system was infected by malware in December 2017, compromising the department’s computer system, including employee email and internal operation servers. The cost of the state’s response to the malware attack exceeded its self-insured retention of $250,000.

The recent experiences of the City of Atlanta and the Georgia Department of Agriculture exemplify the growing importance of cyber insurance for state and local governments. Governments are frequently considered prime targets for cyberattacks due to a lack of synchronization of government systems, the lack of harmonization among third-party vendors rendering services to those governments, and a dearth of qualified professionals employed by governments due to the fact that more lucrative careers are available in the private sector. Indeed, governments frequently assign cybersecurity to their IT departments, which are already overburdened and under-resourced. At the same time, as local governments become more digital, the impact of a cyberattack can become highly disruptive to the city’s operations, as the City of Atlanta’s experience showed. In fact, Forbes has reported that Lloyd’s City Risk Index estimates that the risk of cyberattack is the third most consequential threat to Atlanta and other North American cities, with a collective potential impact of more than $93 billion. Given these substantial risks, Lloyd’s concludes that cities and states should better utilize cyber insurance, with a 1% increase in insurance penetration resulting in a corresponding 22% decrease in the risk to taxpayers.

The growing need for cyber insurance among cities, counties, and states melds both the areas of local government law and insurance coverage and is certain to be a major growth area in the near future. Hopefully, Atlanta’s painful learning experience will better prepare other local governments in the months and years to come.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Matthew Weiss at (678) 399-6356 or [email protected].

Georgia Court of Appeals Concludes the Term “Affiliate” is Ambiguous

Posted on: February 4th, 2019

By: Jake Carroll

In Salinas v. Atlanta Gas Light Company,[1] the Georgia Court of Appeals’ recently examined whether Georgia Natural Gas (“GNG”) and Atlanta Gas Light Company (“AGLC”) were “affiliates.” Both AGLC and GNG were owned and controlled, either directly or through an intermediary, by a company named AGL Resources, Inc.

In Salinas, AGLC sought to dismiss Plaintiff’s claims and compel arbitration. In support of its argument, AGLC relied on a term in GNG’s service agreement that required the Plaintiff to arbitrate any disputes with GNG’s “affiliates.” However, since the term “affiliate” was not defined in GNG’s agreement, the Court of Appeals looked at how the term “affiliate” is defined in the Georgia Code, Black’s Law Dictionary, and other jurisdictions, and ultimately determined that the term is ambiguous. The Court of Appeals construed the agreement against GNG—the drafter of the contract—and as a result, AGLC could not demand arbitration of Plaintiff’s dispute.

While the Court of Appeals did not set-out a specific definition for “affiliate,” the Court’s analysis provides a couple of practice tips to anyone involved in drafting, reviewing, or enforcing contracts, including commercial agreements, government contracts, or insurance policies.

  1. Define Your Terms: The Salinas Court may not have had to address the meaning of “affiliates” if the Agreement had defined the term. But, since the term was not defined, the Court looked elsewhere, including other jurisdictions, the Georgia Code, and the dictionary to determine its meaning. Including a definitions section is an easy way to set out the agreed-upon meaning of a term throughout a contract, and should not be overlooked.
  2. Be Explicit: If there is a certain sibling or parent corporation that should be a beneficiary of a contract, consider listing the specific “affiliates” to which the contract or agreement should apply.
  3. Check Your State’s Code: The Court noted that the term “affiliate” is defined over 20 times in the Georgia Code, and the definitions vary. For example, in the context of financial institutions, an affiliate is an entity that controls the election of a majority of directors, trustees of a financial institution, or an entity that owns or controls 50 percent or more of the financial institution. O.C.G.A. § 7-1-4 (1). In Georgia’s Corporations Act, the definition of affiliate is broader: “a person that directly, or indirectly through one or more intermediaries, controls or is controlled by or is under common control with a specified person.” O.C.G.A. § 14-2-1110 (1).[2] Depending on the type of corporate entity, “affiliate” may not include every entity in a corporate structure, and certain rules regarding ownership and control may be relevant.

If you need help with this issue, or any other commercial law questions, Jake Carroll practices construction and commercial law, is licensed to practice in Georgia and Florida, and is a member of Freeman Mathis & Gary’s Construction Law and Tort and Catastrophic Loss practice groups. He represents corporations and manufacturers in a wide range of litigation and corporate matters involving breach of contract, business torts, and products liability claims. He can be reached at [email protected].

[1] 347 Ga. App. 480; 819 S.E.2d 903 (2018).
[2] See also O.C.G.A. § 18-2-71 (1) (B) (“Affiliate” has multiple definitions, including “[a] corporation 20 percent or more of whose outstanding voting securities are directly or indirectly owned, controlled, or held with power to vote by the debtor or a person who directly or indirectly owns, controls, or holds with power to vote 20 percent or more of the outstanding voting securities of the debtor[.] …”).