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FMG Law Blog Line

Posts Tagged ‘notice’

Undefeated Records: Good for Sports & Business

Posted on: November 1st, 2019

By: Brittany Kurtz

A contentious rivalry between divisional foes late in the season fueled a halftime bathroom brawl in December 2014 leading a Dallas Cowboys fan to file negligence claims against the Philadelphia Eagles organization and its security manager at Lincoln Financial Field. The Cowboys fan alleged a group of Eagles fans repeatedly taunted him, going so far as to grab his star-emblazoned hat and tossing it into a urinal, ultimately ending in an altercation with the Cowboys fan on the ground and surrounded by a handful of attackers. These attackers were never found, but the Cowboys fan alleged his injuries were caused by the Eagles organization and its security manager for failing to provide reasonable security within the bathroom.

Most surprising was the Cowboys fan’s favorable jury verdict in a Philadelphia courtroom. The Philadelphia Eagles organization appealed to the Superior Court as it believed the Cowboys fan failed to meet his burden of proving a duty owed by the organization regarding the security measures in place and was entitled to Judgement N.O.V.

The Superior Court acknowledged the Philadelphia Eagles organization held its property open to the public for business purposes and would be subject to liability for negligent or intentional harmful acts of third persons which it must take reasonable precaution against that which might be reasonably anticipated. Generally, individuals are not liable for the criminal conduct of another absent a preexisting duty. However, the Eagles organization voluntarily undertook a duty to protect its business invitees, including Cowboys fans, from fighting during football games at Lincoln Financial Field. Therefore, the Eagles organization had a duty to protect its invitees against third party conduct when it had reason to anticipate such conduct.

The Superior Court determined the Eagles organization and its security management team as a matter of law did not have notice of violent assaults regularly occurring in its restrooms during games, therefore it was reasonable to not have a stationed security guard at the restrooms. The security logs only demonstrated the Eagles organization was on notice that there were persons who became incapacitated because of intoxication in the restrooms, not violence.

The Cowboys fan also alleged negligent operation of the security program in place as it is known that wearing opposing team apparel to an Eagles’ game is dangerous. However, the security team employs undercover guards wearing the opposing team’s gear in order to identify those members of the convocation of Eagles who harass fans of the opposing team to be addressed. Therefore, the Court determined the Cowboys fan failed to demonstrate the security program was conducted without reasonable care and that the Eagles organization should have reasonably anticipated violent assaults occur in the restrooms and should have been monitored by security. The Court vacated the judgment entered in favor of the Cowboys fan and remanded to the trial court for entry of judgment in favor Philadelphia Eagles organization and its security management team. Pearson v. Phila. Eagles, LLC, 2019 PA Super. 304 (October 11, 2019).

Record keeping played a critical role as the Superior Court relied heavily upon the security logs and documentation of the security team to determine whether the Philadelphia Eagles organization had notice of prior instances of violence occurring in its restrooms during games. Documentation provides objective evidence to the courts and juries which helps to provide them a clearer picture and, in this case, clearly showing a property owner’s lack of notice for third party violence towards its invitees in the restrooms.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Brittany Kurtz at [email protected]

Florida Employment Law and The Use of Consistent Terminology

Posted on: January 17th, 2019

By: Michael Kouskoutis

Florida’s First DCA recently reversed summary judgment in favor of Florida A&M University (FAMU) in a contract dispute with the school’s former head football and basketball coaches.

The coaches both had 4-year contracts with the University, each with a specific end date and permitting early termination only in specific circumstances.  Well before their contractual end dates, both coaches received 60 days’ notice of termination, with neither coach having committed any of the terminable offenses listed in the contract. The coaches filed suit, demanding (among others) payment on the remainder of the contracts. On FAMU’s motion for summary judgment, the trial court agreed with the University, that the terminations were justified by the University’s regulations, which permit employee termination upon 60 days’ notice.

On appeal, the First DCA emphasized that FAMU did not use consistent terminology with respect to termination in its regulations and employment contracts, leading the Court to conclude that an ambiguity exists since different meanings may have been intended. Further, because the Court determined that the termination provisions were ambiguous, it also reversed summary judgment on the coaches’ claims for fraudulent inducement and negligent misrepresentation.

As this case awaits trial, employers should be mindful of the terminology used among its employment and regulatory documentation.  If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Michael Kouskoutis at [email protected].

Is Georgia Game for Growing Bad Faith Liability?

Posted on: July 17th, 2018

By: Jessica Samford

As discussed in my last blog on bad faith, seeking bifurcation can be a proactive means to distinguish the issue of coverage from the issue of bad faith and appropriately manage the all too often unwieldy discovery process before it’s too late.  A recent case in Georgia is an interesting illustration of an insurer’s attempt to bifurcate issues after the discovery stage in a bad faith failure to settle claim in particular and is yet another cautionary example for insurers to carefully consider the increasing potential for extracontractual liability in Georgia.  Whiteside v. GEICO Indem. Co., 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 87868, *3-*4 (M.D. Ga. May 25, 2018).

In that case, the trial court declined to bifurcate the issues of liability and proximate cause of damages at the trial stage as requested by Geico, which sought to have a jury determine whether or not Geico could be held liable for bad faith failure to settle before being presented with evidence of the default judgment entered against Geico’s insured of almost $3 million and causation of same.  Separation of liability and damages issues was not warranted according to the trial court because facts relating to Geico’s claim handling were relevant to both, and Geico’s concerns could be handled through proper jury instructions, special interrogatories, and the verdict form.  See also Whiteside v. GEICO Indem. Co., 2018 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 52761 (M.D. Ga. Mar. 29, 2018).  The trial court did, however, bifurcate the claim for punitive damages from the rest of the jury trial.

The result was a jury verdict of $2 million against Geico for failing to settle in response to a bicyclist’s demand for the $30,000 policy limit based on medical bills of almost $10,000 following a motor vehicle accident.  Previously, Geico had argued there was no coverage due to the insured’s failure to notify Geico of the subsequent lawsuit she was served.  Whiteside v. GEICO Indem. Co., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 203617, *6, 2017 WL 6347174 (M.D. Ga. Dec. 12, 2017).  Notwithstanding such a flagrant breach of the policy’s notice conditions, the trial court did not see coverage as being an issue since that coverage defense did not exist at the time Geico responded to the demand by offering to settle for about half the limits instead.

These unusual circumstances are certainly noteworthy, and extracontractual damages such as these are becoming less uncommon in Georgia bad faith cases.  FMG’s Insurance Coverage and Bad Faith BlogLine has already geared up to cover the Georgia Supreme Court’s upcoming rulings after granting cert on the scope of what triggers failure to settle liability in Georgia, not to mention the proposed changes to the Restatement of the Law of Liability Insurance and their impact.  Whatever is in the cards for extracontractual liability in Georgia, the risks presented by settlement demands should be evaluated in light of these current trends.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Jessica Samford at [email protected].