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Posts Tagged ‘California’

States are Busy on the Cyber Front

Posted on: February 19th, 2020

By: Amy C. Bender

2020 is off to a busy start, with several states taking action on cybersecurity legislation and issuing other legal updates. Highlights include:

California – California’s Attorney General has issued revised proposed regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), which creates consumer rights relating to the access to, deletion of, and sharing of personal information that is collected by businesses. The updates, which are aimed at providing more relief for consumers and clarity to covered businesses, include changes to definitions, notice and other requirements for covered businesses, and consumer rights and requests. The revised proposed regulations are available here and are currently under a public comment period.

Maryland – In the first decision of its kind under Maryland law, a federal court has ruled that a loss of software and data due to a ransomware attack was covered under a business owner’s property insurance policy. Specifically, the court found that the loss qualified as a “direct physical loss of or damage” to covered property (the affected computer server and networked computers) based on the loss of the data and software in the computer system and the loss of functionality to the computer system itself. The court reasoned that the policy did not limit covered losses to tangible property only or to total property losses. The decision is available here.

Massachusetts – The state’s legislature has stalled a proposed consumer data privacy law (available here) that would have imposed notice and disclosure requirements on businesses that collect consumers’ personal information, provided consumers the right to delete and opt out of third-party disclosure of collected personal information, and allowed consumers to sue for violations of the act without having to show any resulting damage. The bill has been sent to a “study order,” where a committee will study it and report its findings.

New York – The Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act (“SHIELD ACT”), available here, amends the state’s existing data breach notification law to require any person or business that owns or licenses computerized data that includes private information of New York residents to develop, implement, and maintain reasonable safeguards to protect the security, confidentiality, and integrity of the private information, including disposal of data. The data security provisions go into effect on March 21, 2020.

Virginia – Similar to Massachusetts, Virginia’s legislature has delayed and referred to study several privacy-related bills, including bills relating to consumer rights regarding access and sale of their personal data, destruction and disposal of records containing personally identifiable information, and collection and safekeeping of biometric data by employers.

Washington – The legislature has introduced a revised version of a proposed law, the Washington Privacy Act (available here), which would apply to certain private business that control or process consumer personal data and that are located within or targeted to residents of the state. The law would provide consumers rights regarding their personal data, impose responsibilities on covered controllers and processors, and regulate facial recognition services. The bill is now scheduled for a public hearing.

Freeman Mathis & Gary’s Data Privacy and Security Practice Group is here to help clients with policies and training. If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Amy Bender at [email protected].

Tips on Dealing With Pro Per Parties In California

Posted on: January 15th, 2020

By: Greg Fayard

At some point in their career, lawyers deal with the unrepresented—or pro pers. In California, there’s now an ethical rule that governs how to fairly and properly engage with opposing parties who do not have lawyers.

Rule 4.3 of the Rules of Professional Conduct for California lawyers says a lawyer cannot tell an unrepresented party he or she is disinterested or neutral. If the lawyer reasonably believes the pro per thinks the opposing lawyer is neutral, the lawyer needs to make a reasonable effort to correct that misunderstanding.

If a lawyer knows or suspects the interests of the unrepresented person conflicts with the lawyer’s client, the lawyer cannot give legal advice to him or her, but may advise the person to get counsel. Further, lawyers shall not try to get privileged or confidential information from pro pers. Under Rule 4.3, a lawyer can negotiate with unrepresented parties, but the lawyer must disclose that he or she represents an opposing party.

The policy behind this rule is fairness to pro pers, and to not take advantage of them because they do not have counsel.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Greg Fayard at [email protected], or any other member of our Lawyers Professional Liability Practice Group, a list of which can be found at www.fmglaw.com.

AB5: California’s Controversial Gig-Work Law Took Effect January 1, 2020

Posted on: January 7th, 2020

By:  Margot Parker

As of January 1, 2020, California’s AB5 may require employers to reclassify hundreds of thousands of independent contractors as employees with broad labor law protections.  The new law codifies the “ABC test” adopted by the California Supreme Court in Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles in 2018.  Under the ABC test, a worker may only be classified as an independent contractor if it can be shown that:

A. The worker is free from the control and direction of the hiring entity, both under the contract for the performance of work and in fact;

B. The worker performs work that is outside of the usual course of the hiring entity’s business, and

C. The worker is engaged in independently established trade, occupation, or business that is of the same nature as the work performed for the hiring entity.

This strict three-pronged test now applies to the requirements of the California Labor Code and the California Unemployment Insurance Code.  Beginning July 1, 2020, it will also apply to the California Workers Compensation Code.

While the law provides exemptions for certain occupations and industries (including accountants, architects, dentists, insurance brokers, lawyers, and engineers), the Legislature declined to exempt app-based ride services and food delivery companies, whose workers complain they often earn less than minimum wage.  Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, Postmates and Instacart are mounting a ballot initiative to exempt their workers, while trucking associations, photographers, and freelance journalists have brought other initiatives opposing the law.

Given such controversy, the law’s author intends to introduce additional legislation to clarify AB5 this year.  In the meantime, employers should consult with legal counsel and review independent contractor classifications to ensure proper classification of workers pursuant to the ABC test.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Margot Parker at [email protected].

Federal Court Temporarily Enjoins California’s Ban On Mandatory Arbitration Agreements

Posted on: January 7th, 2020

By: Brad Adler

Employers will recall that California passed a law in October, 2019 (AB 51) that would limit the ability of employers to require mandatory arbitration of certain statutory employment claims as of January 1, 2020.  Specifically, AB 51 provided that employers could no longer require, as a condition of employment, that a job applicant or employee arbitrate any alleged violation of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act or the California Labor Code.  After AB 51 was passed, a coalition of business groups led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce filed a lawsuit seeking to block AB 51 from taking effect.

On December 30, 2019, Judge Kimberly Mueller of the Eastern District of California granted a temporary restraining order in response to that lawsuit, which effectively blocks AB 51 from going into effect until the Court holds a preliminary injunction hearing on January 10, 2020.  At the January 10 hearing, the Court will decide whether to grant a preliminary injunction that would block implementation of AB 51 until the case is fully resolved.  As a result of the Court’s temporary restraining order, at least as of right now, it still is lawful to continue requiring employees to sign arbitration agreements.  But please be aware that the lawsuit challenging AB 51 is moving quickly so employers with California employees should continue to monitor this lawsuit.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Brad Adler at [email protected].

California Lawyers Should Not Lie

Posted on: December 20th, 2019

By: Greg Fayard

It seems obvious, but lawyers shouldn’t lie. A new Rule of Professional Conduct applicable to California lawyers says that while representing a client, a lawyer shall not knowingly make a false statement of material fact or law to a third person.

Rule 4.1 is aimed at lawyers communicating with opposing counsel or an opposing party. This duty to not misrepresent facts or law to others includes a lawyer “agreeing” with statements he or she knows are false. For example, if a lawyer hears a factually untrue statement said in a court hearing, and orally agrees with that statement, knowing it is false, that verbal affirmation runs afoul of the rule.

However, if the lawyer remained silent after hearing the false statement, such silence would likely not violate the rule—as silence is not an affirmation. Of course, the best practice for all lawyers, in California and elsewhere, is to tell the truth, don’t lie to others, and correct statements that the lawyer knows are untrue, even if it may not necessarily help the client’s case.

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact Greg Fayard at [email protected], or any other member of our Lawyers Professional Liability Practice Group, a list of which can be found at www.fmglaw.com.